Vestibular Testing

Timothy C. Hain, MD; Marcello Cherchi, MD, PhD, FAAN Neuro-otology p. 330-347 April 2021, Vol.27, No.2 doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000000978
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PURPOSE OF REVIEW Vestibular testing, both at the bedside and in the laboratory, is often critical in diagnosing patients with symptoms of vertigo, dizziness, unsteadiness, and oscillopsia. This article introduces readers to core concepts, as well as recent advances, in bedside and instrumented vestibular assessments.

RECENT FINDINGS Vestibular testing has improved immensely in the past 2 decades. While history and bedside testing is still the primary method of differential diagnosis in patients with dizziness, advances in technology such as the ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test for superior canal dehiscence and the video head impulse test for vestibular neuritis have capabilities that go far beyond the bedside examination. Current vestibular testing now allows clinicians to test all five vestibular sensors in the inner ear.

SUMMARY Contemporary vestibular testing technology can now assess the entire vestibular periphery. Relatively subtle conditions, such as superior canal dehiscence or a subtle vestibular neuritis, can now be diagnosed with far greater certainty.

Address correspondence to Dr Marcello Cherchi, 645 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60611, [email protected].

RELATIONSHIP DISCLOSURE: Dr Hain has served as an associate editor for Audiology and Neurotology. Dr Cherchi reports no disclosures.

UNLABELED USE OF PRODUCTS/INVESTIGATIONAL USE DISCLOSURE: Drs Hain and Cherchi report no disclosures.

© 2021 American Academy of Neurology.