Cerebral Small Vessel DiseaseERRATUM

Natalia S. Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, FAHA; Mark Etherton, MD, PhD Cerebrovascular Disease p. 332-352 April 2020, Vol.26, No.2 doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000000841
REVIEW ARTICLES
BROWSE ARTICLES
Article as PDF
-- Select an option --

PURPOSE OF REVIEW This article reviews the clinical significance and neuroimaging characteristics of cerebral small vessel disease and the impact on neurologic disease and current and potential therapeutic approaches.

RECENT FINDINGS Cerebral small vessel disease is increasingly prevalent and highly heterogeneous in neuroimaging and clinical presentation. Small subcortical infarcts, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, cortical microinfarcts, and white matter hyperintensity of presumed vascular origin represent the major neuroimaging markers of small vessel disease. Increasing small vessel disease burden is associated with risk of incident stroke and dementia, as well as other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Current research strategies are targeting elucidation of the mechanisms of small vessel disease pathogenesis and pursuing clinical trials of therapeutic agents to reduce the clinical manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease.

SUMMARY Cerebral small vessel disease is common in aging adults and represents a major risk factor for multiple acute and chronic neurologic diseases. Increased awareness of cerebral small vessel disease as a modifiable risk factor holds potential for reducing neurologic disease morbidity and mortality across diverse populations in the United States and worldwide.

Address correspondence to Dr Natalia S. Rost, J. Philip Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, 175 Cambridge St, Ste 300, Boston MA 02114, nrost@partners.org.

RELATIONSHIP DISCLOSURE: Dr Rost serves as an assistant editor for Stroke and has received personal compensation for serving on the scientific advisory boards for Omniox and Sanofi Genzyme and as a consultant for Abbvie Inc. Dr Rost has received research/grant support as a principal investigator for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (R01 NS082285, R01 NS086905, and U19 NS115388) and publishing royalties as a contributor to UpToDate, Inc. Dr Etherton has received a research grant from the American Heart Association (17CPOST33680102).

UNLABELED USE OF PRODUCTS/INVESTIGATIONAL USE DISCLOSURE: Drs Rost and Etherton report no disclosures.

© 2020 American Academy of Neurology.