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When rubber meets the road

how innate features of adaptive immune cells play critical roles in transplant alloimmunity

Morris, Anna B.; Ford, Mandy L.

Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation: December 2019 - Volume 24 - Issue 6 - p 659–663
doi: 10.1097/MOT.0000000000000706
INNATE - ADAPTIVE IMMUNE INTERFACE IN ALLOGRAFT REJECTION AND SURVIVAL: Edited by Xian C. Li
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Purpose of review Studies on adaptive cells have largely focused on features that are specific to adaptive immunity. However, adaptive cells utilize innate cell features to modulate their responses, and this area of T and B-cell biology is understudied. This review will highlight recent work done to understand how innate features of adaptive immune cells modulate alloimmunity.

Recent findings Over the past year, research has shown that T-cell-expressed danger-associated molecular patterns, Toll-like receptors, complement receptors, and Fc receptors regulate T-cell alloimmunity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Further, IL-17 and p40 of IL-12 have been implicated in the migration of T cells into allografts. Lastly, innate B cells, specifically B1 cells, have been shown to produce clinically relevant autoantibody associated with poor graft outcome.

Summary These data provide evidence that innate features are utilized by adaptive immune cells to control adaptive alloimmunity.

Department of Surgery, Emory Transplant Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Correspondence to Mandy L. Ford, PhD, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Tel: +1 404 727 2900; e-mail: Mandy.ford@emory.edu

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