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Intracranial pressure and glaucoma

Berdahl, John Pa; Allingham, R Randb

Current Opinion in Ophthalmology: March 2010 - Volume 21 - Issue 2 - p 106–111
doi: 10.1097/ICU.0b013e32833651d8
Glaucoma: Edited by Donald L. Budenz

Purpose of review Glaucoma remains a disease with an unclear basic pathophysiology. The optic nerve travels through two pressurized regions: the intraocular space and the intracranial space. Some authors have suggested that the relationship between intraocular pressure and intracranial pressure may play a fundamental role in the development of glaucoma.

Recent findings Recent studies have shown that intracranial pressure is lower in patients with glaucoma and normal-tension glaucoma. Conversely, intracranial pressure appears to be elevated in patients with ocular hypertension. Early mathematical modeling studies have suggested that the counterbalance provided by intracranial pressure would be an important factor in the development of glaucoma.

Summary The relationship between intraocular pressure and intracranial pressure may play an important role in the development of glaucoma.

aVance Thompson Vision, 1310 W 22nd Street, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA

bDuke University Eye Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA

Correspondence to John Berdahl, MD, Vance Thompson Vision, 1310 W 22nd Street, Sioux Falls, SD 57103, USA Tel: +1 605 328 3937; e-mail: johnberdahl@gmail.com

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.