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Editorial introductions

Current Opinion in Neurology: August 2005 - Volume 18 - Issue 4 - p i
doi: 10.1097/01.wco.0000177326.85703.c2
Editorial introductions

Current Opinion in Neurology was launched in 1988. It is one of a successful series of review journals whose unique format is designed to provide a systematic and critical assessment of the literature as presented in the many primary journals. The field of neurology is divided into 14 sections that are reviewed once a year. Each section is assigned a Section Editor, a leading authority in the area, who identifies the most important topics at that time. Here we are pleased to introduce the Journal's Section Editors for this issue.

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Section Editors

Martin Ingvar, MD, PhD

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Figure 1

Professor Martin Ingvar is Director of the Karolinska MR Research Center at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. He is also acting chairman in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience of Karolinska Institute. He graduated from University of Lund as MD and PhD. His scientific career continued at the Karolinska Institute where he trained in Clinical Neurophysiology in parallel. His early scientific training was in experimental brain research with a focus on selective neuronal necrosis in seizures and cerebral ischemia. In 1987 he started his training in human brain research with methods such as PET, MRI and EEG. Over the years the laboratory has incorporated expertise in experimental psychology, mathematics and physics. He has tutored 5 PhDs to graduation and is currently tutoring 7 students. He has published some 150 papers in peer reviewed journals and some 30 chapters.

The laboratory has a core facility function to supply qualified imaging resources to other research groups within the Karolinska Institute. The scientific focus is clarification of the cerebral mechanisms of learning and adaptation. In this work the experimental probes pertain to language and memory and also to the field of experimental pain. He was one of the initiators of a series of studies on the effects of learning to read and write on the cognitive organization in the brain. During the course of the last years the central mechanisms of placebo and coping have come into focus. This has generated a series of studies on top down mechanisms for regulation of emotion and attention. Experimental manipulation of expectation has been used as a probe.

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Gregor K Wenning, MD, PhD

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Figure 2

Professor Gregor K Wenning graduated from Münster University in 1991. He trained in Neurology at the University Hospitals of Tübingen, London and Innsbruck. He started his scientific career at the Institute of Neurology in London where he performed a series of clinicopathological and experimental studies on multiple system atrophy (MSA). He received a PhD from the University of London in 1996. Since 1999 he has served as Consultant Neurologist and Assistant Professor at the Parkinson Centre of the Department of Neurology at the Medical University Innsbruck. He also heads the Neurodegeneration Laboratory at the same institution, focusing on animal models of MSA. Together with Professor Werner Poewe he initiated the European Multiple System Atrophy Study Group in 1999. EMSA-SG has generated the first validated assessment tool for MSA (Unified MSA Rating Scale – UMSARS) and currently conducts a large natural history study in 12 European countries and Israel as well as several phase II intervention trials. EMSA-SG also runs a DNA bank for neurogenetic studies. Professor Wenning has published more than 200 original papers, reviews and invited book chapters on MSA and related parkinsonian disorders. He received the Birkmayer price in 1998 and the Oppenheimer award in 2004 for recognition of his work on MSA.

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.