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Editorial introductions

Editorial introductions

Current Opinion in Neurology: February 2005 - Volume 18 - Issue 1 - p i-ii
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Current Opinion in Neurology was launched in 1988. It is one of a successful series of review journals whose unique format is designed to provide a systematic and critical assessment of the literature as presented in the many primary journals. The field of neurology is divided into 14 sections that are reviewed once a year. Each section is assigned a Section Editor, a leading authority in the area, who identifies the most important topics at that time. Here we are pleased to introduce the Journal's Editor, Deputy Editor and the Section Editors for this issue.

Editor

Richard S.J. Frackowiak, MA, MD, DSc, FRCP, FMedSci, Dr (hon causa, Liege)

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Figure 1

Richard Frackowiak is Vice-Provost (Special Projects) of University College London. He moved to the post from the Deanship of the Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, which he held for 4 years until 2002. He is a Professor of Cognitive Neurology at UCL and held a Wellcome Trust Principal Clinical Research Fellowship until this year. He founded and chaired the Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience and its Functional Imaging Laboratory from its institution in 1994, where he continues to be research active, to hold a Wellcome Trust programme grant and to function as a Principal Investigator. His scientific interest is in structural and functional brain mapping in health and disease. His focus is on plasticity and recovery from brain injury. He has made many discoveries in these areas and also contributed fundamentally to the methods of human functional and structural neuroimaging with PET and MRI.

He obtained his biomedical and clinical education at Cambridge University and the Middlesex Hospital Medical School and his research degrees at the MRC Cyclotron Unit and London University. He has won the Ipsen and Wilhelm Feldberg and Klaus Joachim Zulch prizes. Part of his work is currently centred at the Salpetriere Hospital and the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris where he is a foreign INSERM research fellow involved in creating a neuroimaging research laboratory. He acts in an advisory capacity as honorary director of the Neuroimaging Laboratory of the IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia in Rome. He also has an adjunt appointment in New York's Cornell University Medical School department of neurology. His scientific output includes over 310 peer reviewed papers and the books ‘Human Brain Function’ in its second edition and ‘Brain Mapping: The Disorders’, both published by Elsevier. He is the fourth most highly cited British biomedical scientist in the decade 1990–1999 and the second most highly cited researcher in the field of Neuroscience and Behaviour 1994–2004 (ISI).

Deputy Editor

Anne B. Young, MD, PhD

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Figure 2

Anne B. Young, Julieanne Dorn Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and the Chief, Neurology Service at Massachusetts General Hospital is a researcher and clinician whose work at the bench and bedside have concentrated on neurotransmitter systems in the basal ganglia and their role in Huntington's, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Dr. Young holds membership in both the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Young is a Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude graduate of Vassar College who completed her medical studies at Johns Hopkins in 1973. She received a Ph.D. in Pharmacology from Johns Hopkins in 1974, and then completed residency training in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco. After residency, she joined the neurology faculty at the University of Michigan where she advanced to Professor in 1985. In 1991, she was recruited to the Massachusetts General Hospital as Chief of the Neurology Service and Julieanne Dorn Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Young provided some of the first evidence that glutamic acid is a neurotransmitter. Subsequently, she and her colleagues identified glutamate as a transmitter of corticostriatal and corticospinal tracts. Her laboratory first described techniques to measure subtypes of glutamate receptors autoradiographically and went on to demonstrate receptor alterations in Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease.

Dr. Young's current research work includes elucidating cellular and systems mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In an effort to help develop therapeutic targets for human disorders of movement, she is conducting studies on the vulnerability of neurons to excitotoxic injury and the selective expression of glutamate receptors in these neurons.

Recently, she has discovered that transgenic animals expressing exon 1 of the huntingtin protein (Huntington's disease is caused by a mutation of the gene encoding this protein) have markedly altered receptors that may play a central role in the neuronal degeneration of Huntington's disease. Her studies suggest that mutant huntingtin may alter receptor expression selectively when it accumulates in the nucleus. Altered receptor expression occurs early and may contribute to selective cell death.

Dr. Young serves on the editorial board of numerous biomedical journals and she has been the recipient of many awards and honors for her work. She is a member of the Scientific Advisory Boards of several voluntary organizations. She is past President of the American Neurological Association and the Society for Neuroscience.

Section Editors

Adolfo Miguel Bronstein, MD, Ph D, FRCP

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Figure 3

Adolfo Miguel Bronstein is Professor of Clinical Neuro-otology at Imperial College London and a Consultant Neurologist at Charing Cross Hospital and at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London. He was born in 1950 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he did his basic medical and neurological training. In 1981 he emigrated to London, UK, where he worked for twenty years in the Medical Research Council Unit at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square. Following the untimely death of David Marsden, and the disbandment of the MRC Unit at Queen Square, he took a personal professorial chair at the Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Imperial College London where he is currently the head of the Department of Movement and Balance (http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/about/divisions/neuro/npmdepts/movandbal). Professor Bronstein has published 200 peer-reviewed papers, mostly on basic mechanisms and clinical aspects of the balance, vestibular and eye movement systems and is the lead Editor of the first and second (2004) edition of the book ‘Clinical Disorders of Balance, Posture and Gait’. He is an associate editor of the journal Gait and Posture and a member of the editorial board of several neurological and otological journals. He was a founding member and current president of the British Society of Neuro-otology. Professor Bronstein is an enthusiastic teacher in neuro-otology and neuro-ophthalmology and is an active member of the teaching sessions of the European Neurological Society, the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the World Federation of Neurology.

Cornelius Weiller, MD, Prof. Dr

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Figure 4

Cornelius Weiller is Professor of Neurology and Head of the Department of Neurology at Hamburg University. He moved to this position from the Chairmanship of Neurology at the University of Jena 5 years ago. He is Director and Founding Director of NeuroImage Nord, a interdisciplinary Institution for scientific NeuroImaging of the Universities Hamburg, Kiel and Lübeck, Senior Honorary Fellow of the University College London, Chairperson of the Advisory board of the Lurija- Institute at Konstanz and holder of two major research programme grants from the DFG and the BMBF. His main scientific interests are the adaptation o f the human brain in learning and during recovery from brain damage and the pathophysiology of stroke. He has won the hugo-Spatz-Prize, several young investigator awards, is member of the GAFOS faculty and Section Head – Faculty 1000. His scientific output includes over 150 peer-reviewed papers and three books in German.

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.