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Maternal immunization as a strategy to decrease susceptibility to infection in newborn infants

Lindsey, Benjamina; Kampmann, Beatea,b; Jones, Christinea,c

Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases: June 2013 - Volume 26 - Issue 3 - p 248–253
doi: 10.1097/QCO.0b013e3283607a58
PAEDIATRIC AND NEONATAL INFECTIONS: Edited by Paul T. Heath
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Purpose of review Following on from the success of maternal tetanus vaccination, recent research has shown that other vaccines given in pregnancy can protect against vaccine-preventable infections in early infancy. This review will outline these recent developments and highlight the impact on current clinical practice.

Recent findings Maternal immunization provides protection to the newborn through the transfer of vaccine-induced IgG across the placenta, a process that is affected by multiple variables. The safety of newly recommended maternal vaccines has been further tested in recent studies. Maternal vaccination against influenza and pertussis is recommended in the United Kingdom and United States, with new studies indicating their efficacy. A number of additional maternal vaccines are also in the pipeline, which could be used to combat neonatal infection. Recent research findings have highlighted some of the reasons for the poor uptake of current recommendations among pregnant women.

Summary Tetanus, influenza and pertussis vaccines are now recommended for use during pregnancy, with new vaccines, such as group B streptococcus and respiratory syncytial virus, being developed to prevent important neonatal infections in the future.

aAcademic Department of Paediatrics, Imperial College London, London, UK

bMedical Research Council Unit, The Gambia

cPaediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, St George's, University of London, London, UK

Correspondence to Dr Christine Jones, PhD, Room 2.215D, Level 2, Jenner Wing, St George's, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, SW17 0RE, UK. Tel: +44 020 872 527 88; fax: +44 020 872 507 16; e-mail: cjones@sgul.ac.uk

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.