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Demand creation for primary biomedical prevention

identifying lessons across interventions to inform daily oral preexposure prophylaxis programs

Bass, Emilya; Fitch, Lauraa; Gomez, Anabela; Loar, Rebeccab

Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS: January 2019 - Volume 14 - Issue 1 - p 28–40
doi: 10.1097/COH.0000000000000518
CREATING DEMAND FOR HIV PRODUCTS, DRUGS AND DIAGNOSTICS: Edited by David Ripin and Sharonann Lynch
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Purpose of review At a moment when UNAIDS (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS) has acknowledged a ‘prevention crisis,’ and multiple countries and implementers are emphasizing ‘user-centered’ and/or differentiated models of delivering HIV treatment and prevention, it is essential to understand and act on best practices from all relevant interventions to create effective oral preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) programs.

Recent findings It is possible to adapt private sector approaches to understanding and segmenting the preferences and mindsets of potential consumers to primary HIV prevention programs, as demonstrated by a voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC)-focused intervention that successfully trained and supported counselors to identify and deliver tailored messages to men potentially undergoing VMMC. Literature on PrEP and demand creation is less extensive and suggests uneven application of user-centered design and demand-side thinking; a recent analysis of condom programing demonstrates that failure to maintain resources for social marketing can drive a collapse in use and an increase in HIV incidence.

Summary Approaches to demand creation for primary prevention are dynamic and evolving. However, the lag between implementation and publication means that there is a paucity of PrEP-specific information. Insights from VMMC and other strategies can and must be considered as part of a more holistic approach to increasing demand for primary prevention interventions.

aAVAC, New York, New York

bR Loar Consulting, Cedar Creek, Texas, USA

Correspondence to Emily Bass, AVAC, 423 West 127th Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10027, USA. Tel: +1 646 369 1454; fax: +1 646 531 2822; e-mail: emily@avac.org

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