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Civil society demand for accountability to achieve the 90-90-90 targets

lessons from Eastern and Southern Africa

Russell, Asiaa; Luba, Maureenb; Mwehonge, Kennethc; Lusimbo, Richardd; Milanga, Maureena; Kavanagh, Matthew M.a,e

Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS: January 2019 - Volume 14 - Issue 1 - p 41–45
doi: 10.1097/COH.0000000000000516
CREATING DEMAND FOR HIV PRODUCTS, DRUGS AND DIAGNOSTICS: Edited by David Ripin and Sharonann Lynch
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Purpose of review Civil society demand for accountability has long been a critical component of the AIDS response. In the age of 90-90-90 HIV treatment goals, civil society advocacy has continued, but often in new forms. In particular, civil society accountability at the intersection of national policy and global health financing has taken on increasing importance, but has not been well documented.

Recent findings Civil society demand for accountability is a key to addressing both the insufficient progress toward ‘90-90-90’ HIV treatment goals and the gap in democracy in HIV policymaking particularly prevalent in the context of internationally financed HIV programming. Civil society can serve three vital functions for accountability: unlocking decision-making processes monopolized by powerful funders through North–South networks; challenging dominant ideas that justify status-quo policies; and ‘venue shifting’ to institutionalize new, more open spaces for policymaking.

Summary The functions of civil society demand for accountability have played key roles in improving the AIDS response in several countries in East and Southern Africa. Dramatically scaling-up capacity for civil society advocacy is necessary in the near term to achieve global HIV goals.

aHealth Global Access Project, Kampala, Uganda and Nairobi, Kenya

bAVAC, Lilongwe, Malawi

cCoalition for Health Promotion and Social Development

dSexual Minorities, Uganda

eGeorgetown University, Washington, DC, USA

Correspondence to Asia Russell, Health Global Access Project, 81 Prospect St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA. E-mail: asia@healthgap.org

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