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Using technology to support HIV self-testing among MSM

LeGrand, Saraa; Muessig, Kathryn E.b; Horvath, Keith J.c; Rosengren, Anna L.d; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.d

doi: 10.1097/COH.0000000000000400
HIV AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES: Edited by Nittaya Phanuphak, Lisa B. Hightow-Weidman, and David A. Wohl

Purpose of review Technology-based HIV self-testing (HST) interventions have the potential to improve access to HIV testing among gay, bisexual, and other MSM, as well as address concerns about HST use, including challenges with linkage to appropriate follow-up services. This review examines studies that use technology-based platforms to increase or improve the experience of HST among MSM.

Recent findings Seven published studies and eight funded studies were included in this review. Comprehensive prevention interventions with free HST kit distribution and interventions that provide free HST kits and support the HST process address a greater number of barriers (e.g., access, correct use of testing kits, and correct interpretation of results) than studies that only distribute free HST kits through technology-based platforms.

Summary By addressing HIV-testing barriers and specific HST concerns, these interventions address a critical need to improve first time and repeat testing rates among MSM. Additional research is needed to determine the efficacy of recent formative HST interventions. If proven efficacious, scale-up of these strategies have the potential to increase HIV testing among MSM via expanded HST uptake.

aCenter for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham

bDepartment of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

cDivision of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, Minnesota

dInstitute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

Correspondence to Sara LeGrand, PhD, Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, 310 Trent Drive, Room 305, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. Tel: +1 919 438 0448; e-mail: sara.legrand@duke.edu

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