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Interventional endoscopic ultrasonography for benign biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered anatomy

Mukai, Shuntaro; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Itoi, Takao

Current Opinion in Gastroenterology: September 2019 - Volume 35 - Issue 5 - p 408–415
doi: 10.1097/MOG.0000000000000565
ENDOSCOPY: Edited by Anthony N. Kalloo
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Purpose of review At present, balloon enteroscopy-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the mainstay of therapy for benign biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered anatomy (SAA). Recently interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) techniques have been used for not only drainage procedure but also treatment procedure in such patients. This review aims to discuss details about interventional EUS techniques in such patients and published clinical data.

Recent findings Antegrade treatment such as antegrade stone removal for bile duct stones or guidewire manipulation across the anastomotic stricture following antegrade balloon dilation and antegrade stenting for the stricture via the approach route created by EUS-bilioenterostomy, so-called EUS-guided antegrade intervention, have been developed. In difficult cases, per-oral cholangioscopy-assisted antegrade intervention has been reported as a useful technique. In addition, other novel alternative interventional EUS techniques have been also reported such as EUS-directed transgastric ERCP in patients with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

Summary Interventional EUS techniques appear to be feasible and safe alternative procedures for benign biliary diseases in patients with SAA after balloon enteroscopy-assisted ERCP failure.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan

Correspondence to Takao Itoi, MD, PhD, FACG, FASGE, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023, Japan. Tel: +81 3 3342 6111; fax: +81 3 5381 6654; e-mail: itoi@tokyo-med.ac.jp

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