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Dietary pattern and colonic diverticulosis

Tursi, Antonio

Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care: September 2017 - Volume 20 - Issue 5 - p 409–413
doi: 10.1097/MCO.0000000000000403
NUTRITION AND THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT: Edited by Maria Isabel T.D. Correia and Alastair Forbes
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Purpose of review To assess the role of dietary pattern on the occurrence of colonic diverticulosis, diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis.

Recent findings High-fiber diet does not prevent diverticulosis occurrence, and results about prevention/treatment of diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis are still conflicting.

No association was seen between nut, corn or popcorn consumption and occurrence of diverticulosis, diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis.

It seems to be a mild association between high alcohol intake and diverticulosis occurrence, whereas alcohol dependence seems to show lower risk of in-hospital mortality due to acute diverticulitis.

Higher red-meat consumption shows mild increased risk of acute diverticulitis, especially when consumed as unprocessed red meat (defined as consumption of ‘beef or lamb as main dish’, ‘pork as main dish’, ‘hamburger’ and ‘beef, pork or lamb as a sandwich or mixed dish’); higher consumption of poultry (viz. white meat) was not associated with risk of acute diverticulitis.

Finally, higher fish intake was associated with reduced risk of diverticulitis in age-adjusted model, but not after further adjustment for other potential confounders.

Summary Current literature data about the role of dietary pattern on the occurrence of colonic diverticulosis, diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis are still too conflicting.

Gastroenterology Service, ASL BAT, Andria (BT), Italy

Correspondence to Antonio Tursi, MD, Via Torino, Gastroenterology Service, ASL BAT, 49, 76123 Andria (BT), Italy. Tel: +39 0883 551094; fax: +39 0883 1978210; e-mail: antotursi@tiscali.it

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