Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Exercise-associated glucose metabolism in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus

Bally, Lia; Laimer, Markus; Stettler, Christoph

Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care: July 2015 - Volume 18 - Issue 4 - p 428–433
doi: 10.1097/MCO.0000000000000185
CARBOHYDRATES: Edited by Luc Tappy and Bettina Mittendorfer
Buy

Purpose of review The primary focus of this review is threefold: first, to summarize available knowledge on exercise-associated glucose metabolism in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM); second, to elucidate physiological mechanisms predisposing to glycemic variations in patients in T1DM; and third, to describe novel approaches derived from physiological perceptions applicable to stabilize exercise-related glycemia in individuals with T1DM.

Recent findings Recent studies corroborate the concept that despite partial differences in counter-regulatory mechanisms individuals with T1DM do not fundamentally differ in their glucose response to exercise when compared with healthy individuals if studies are performed under standardized conditions with insulin and glucose levels held close to physiological ranges. Novel approaches derived from a better understanding of exercise-associated glucose metabolism (e.g., the concept of intermittent high-intensity exercise) may provide alternative ways to master the challenges imposed by exercise to individuals with T1DM.

Summary Exercise still imposes high demands on patients with T1DM and increases risks for hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Deeper insight into the associated metabolic pathways has revealed novel options to stabilize exercise-associated glucose levels in these patients.

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

Correspondence to Christoph Stettler, MD, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern CH-3010, Switzerland. Tel: +41 31 632 40 70; e-mail: christoph.stettler@insel.ch

Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.