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Editorial introductions

doi: 10.1097/01.hco.0000200415.88241.35
Editorial introductions
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Current Opinion in Cardiology was launched in 1985. It is one of a successful series of review journals whose unique format is designed to provide a systematic and critical assessment of the literature as presented in manifold primary journals. The field of cardiology is divided into 14 sections that are reviewed once a year. Each section is assigned a Section Editor, a leading authority in the area, who identifies the most important topics at that time. Here we are pleased to introduce the Journal's Editor and the Section Editor for this issue.

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Editor

Robert Roberts

Figure 1

Figure 1

Robert Roberts, is President and CEO of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. He graduated from Dalhousie University and completed his residency in Internal Medicine and Fellowship in Cardiology at the University of Toronto. Funded by a Canadian Heart Foundation Scholarship he pursued research in enzymology and cardiac metabolism at the University of California, San Diego, following which he moved with Dr Burton E Sobel to St. Louis where he was Director of the Cardiac Care Unit at Barnes Hospital and ultimately became Associate Professor of Medicine, Washington University. On April 1st, 2004, he assumed the position of President and CEO and is building a dedicated Cardiovascular Genetics Centre at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute.

Robert Roberts, edited and co-authored the first textbook on Molecular Cardiology: 1) Molecular Basis of Cardiology, published by Blackwell Scientific Publications and 2) A Primer of Molecular Biology, published by Elsevier. He has been Associate Editor of Hurst's The Heart since the 8th Edition. Dr Roberts, in recognition for his scientific contribution, received the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American College of Cardiology in 1998 and the Award of Meritorious Achievement from The American Heart Association (2001). He delivered the Simon Dack Presidential Plenary Address at the ACC Scientific Sessions 2002 in Atlanta, Georgia titled “Cardiovascular Genetics in the 21st Century”. His early research focused on quantification and diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. He developed the first quantitative assay for plasma MB CK in 1974 and the first radioimmunoassay for MB CK in 1976, which was also the first RIA for an isoenzyme. These developments significantly improved the enzymatic estimates of infarct size and the isoenzymatic diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Today all markers for myocardial infarction including the troponins are antibody based. His clinical research centered around pharmacological interventions in patients with acute myocardial infarction, and the elucidation of the natural history of non-Q-wave infarction.

On moving to Baylor, Dr Robert's basic research effort focused on the application of the techniques of recombinant DNA to cardiac growth and molecular genetics of cardiomyopathies. In the early 1980s, he cloned the genes for human creatine kinases. His achievements were sufficiently recognized by the mid-1980s, when he was chosen by the American Heart Association to direct one of the three initial Bugher Training Programs for molecular biology of the cardiovascular system. He has made many contributions in the field of molecular genetics on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, familial dilated cardiomyopathy, muscular dystrophies, atrial fibrillation and more recently, Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome including having mapped the first locus for familial dilated cardiomyopathy; the first locus for atrial fibrillation and the first locus for ARVD in North America. He recently cloned and sequenced the desmin gene responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy and identified the protein kinase gene for WPW. He identified a novel family of proteins that bind specifically to triplet repeats and is responsible for myotonin mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport. Utilizing genetic animal models expressing human mutations in transgenic mice and a recently developed transgenic rabbit elucidated the pathogenesis of FHCM. The application of genetics in research and clinical management of cardiomyopathies pioneered Baylor Cardiology into a world-wide referral center for inherited cardiovascular disease. Dr Roberts has over 600 publications and in 2002 received the distinction of being one of the Highly Cited Researchers by ISI.

Dr Roberts served on the Cardiovascular Study Section of the NIH (1979–1982), the Cardiology Advisory Committee of the NHLBI (1984–1988) and subsequently the Advisory Council of the National Heart Lung, & Blood Institute (2000–2001). He was Chairman of the Study Section Section for the Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology Committee of the American Heart Association (1990–1993) and a member of the Central Research Review Committee (1990–1995). He served on the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions Committee from 1986–1990. He became a member of the Research Planning Evaluation Committee (RPEC) for the American Heart Association (1994–2001) and served as Vice-Chairman (1997–1999) and Chairman (1999–2001) and during this time, he served on the Board of Directors for the American Heart Association. In 1991, he served as Chairman of the Scientific Sessions for the American College of Cardiology and served on the Board of Trustees (1996–2001). Dr Roberts is a member of the Editorial Board of most cardiology journals. He has lectured throughout the world and has been the plenary speaker at many national meetings including the American College of Chest Physicians Simon Rodbard Lecturer, 61st Annual Scientific Meeting of Japanese Circulation Society, Mikamo Lecturer, Tokyo, Japan 1997, and opening Plenary Speaker for the Japanese College of Cardiology 1995, Japanese Cardiology and the Secondary International Symposium on Heart Failure in Geneva, Switzerland. He is known for his expertise in ischemic heart disease and molecular biology of the cardiovascular system.

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Section Editor

Martin S Green

Figure 2

Figure 2

Dr Green graduated from the faculty of medicine at the University of Toronto in 1975. He then completed his cardiology training at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute in 1981. He furthered his training as a research fellow of the Medical Research Council of Canada in cardiac electrophysiology at the University of Limburg in The Netherlands.

Dr Green was the first electrophysiologist to join the staff at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. He created the arrhythmia service and clinical electrophysiology division and was director from 1983 – 2002. His other strong interest lies in electrocardiography and he has been the director of the ECG department since 1983.

Dr Green has a longstanding interest in cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac ablation and mapping, implantable devices and electrocardiography. His research interests focus on mechanisms and therapies of cardiac arrhythmias; in particular antiarrhythmic drugs and catheter ablation. He has authored and coauthored many papers over the years. Dr Green is a strong advocate for medical education and has sat on the examination board of cardiology for the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada. He also acts as a reviewer for numerous peer-reviewed journals. He has been the program director for the electrophysiology fellowship training program at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute since 1991, and is a renowned expert in his field and has spoken at numerous national and international meetings and symposia.

© 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.