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Treatment of the Septic Hip with Total Hip Arthroplasty

BALDERSTON, RICHARD, A.; HILLER, W., D. B.; IANNOTTI, JOSEPH, P.; PICKENS, GARY, T.; BOOTH, ROBERT, E., JR.; GLUCKMAN, STEPHEN, J.; BUCKLEY, R., MICHAEL; ROTHMAN, RICHARD, H.

Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research: August 1987 - Volume 221 - Issue - p 231–237
SECTION II GENERAL ORTHOPAEDICS: PDF Only
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Forty-three patients, 23 with definite infection and 20 with probable infections before total hip arthroplasty (THA), were compared to 41 matched un-infected patients. The 43 infected patients were treated by 45 operative procedures: eight Girdlestone resections, 12 revisions of total hips, and 25 conversions from infected nontotal hip surgery to total hip arthroplasties. (Two revision THAs were converted to Girdlestones.) The average follow-up period was 38.8 months, with a range of six-118 months. The statistically significant negative prognosticators were gross sepsis at surgery, number of previous operations, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The type of infecting organism did not affect the outcome. The prosthesis survival rate for total hip arthroplasties revised for sepsis was 83%. The prosthesis survival rate for other infected hips treated by total hip arthroplasty was 100%. All groups except Girdlestone resections improved postoperatively. While Girdlestone resection offered acceptable pain relief, total hip arthroplasty provided unequivocally superior function (p = 0.0001).

From The Pennsylvania Hospital, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

© Lippincott-Raven Publishers.