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Clinical Experience With PROSE Fitting: Significance of Diagnosis and Age

Kornberg, Daniel L. B.A.; Dou, Eda B.A.; Wang, Yvonne B.A.; St Clair, Ryan M.D.; Lee, Michelle N. O.D.; Sood, Priyanka M.D.; Fernandez, Ana Alzaga M.D.; Ciralsky, Jessica B. M.D.; Sippel, Kimberly C. M.D.; Rosenblatt, Mark I. M.D., Ph.D.

Eye & Contact Lens: Science & Clinical Practice: March 2016 - Volume 42 - Issue 2 - p 124–128
doi: 10.1097/ICL.0000000000000151
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Objective: To compare ease of adoption of the BostonSight Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Ecosystem device, a custom-fit scleral lens, by patients in different age and diagnosis groups.

Methods: In this prospective study, patients were categorized by age as younger than 60 or 60 years and older and by diagnosis as corneal irregularity (CI) or ocular surface disease (OSD). Ease of adoption of the scleral device was assessed by (1) number of devices and visits required to complete the fitting process, (2) time needed for device insertion and removal, (3) adaptation to the device, as assessed by daily wear time and by time needed to achieve full-time wear (defined as 8 hours per day), and (4) patients' subjective rating of ease of device insertion and removal. The length of the fitting process was also assessed.

Results: There was no significant difference in the number of devices and visits needed between age group younger than 60 and age group of 60 and older or between CI and OSD groups. Patients in all groups achieved full-time wear in less than 2 weeks. Average wear time per week did not differ significantly between age or diagnosis groups. Similarly, the time needed for daily insertion and removal during the fitting period, as well as patients' subjective rating of ease of device insertion and removal, did not differ between age or diagnosis categories. The length of the fitting process was significantly longer in the OSD group compared with the CI group (P<0.001); however, factors not related to ease of adoption of the scleral device may be responsible for this difference.

Conclusions: Patients in both younger and older patient groups adopted the use of a scleral device with equal ease, as did patients in the CI and OSD diagnosis groups.

Department of Ophthalmology (D.L.K., E.D., Y.W., R.S., M.N.L., P.S., A.A.F., J.B.C., K.C.S.), Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; and Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (M.I.R.), University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Address correspondence to Mark I. Rosenblatt, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1855 West Taylor Street, 3138 EEI, Chicago, IL 60612; e-mail: mrosenbl@uic.edu

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Supported in part by an unrestricted grant to the Weill Cornell Department of Ophthalmology from the Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB) and grants from the National Institutes of Health: UL1TR000457 of the Clinical and Translational Science Center at Weill Cornell Medical College, and R01EY018594 from the National Eye Institute.

D. L. Kornberg and E. Dou contributed equally.

Accepted February 09, 2015

© 2016 Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists, Inc.