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Long-term Clinical Outcomes for Overnight Corneal Reshaping in Children and Adults

Lipson, Michael J. O.D., F.A.A.O.

Eye & Contact Lens: Science & Clinical Practice: March 2008 - Volume 34 - Issue 2 - p 94-99
doi: 10.1097/ICL.0b013e31811eba10
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Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate outcomes of overnight corneal reshaping (OCR) in children aged 12 years or younger compared to children older than 12 years and adults at one practice to establish the efficacy and safety of OCR during a period of 51 months.

Methods. Examination records of OCR patients were reviewed for pretreatment data, including manifest refraction, keratometric readings, topography, corneal staining, and age at beginning OCR. Posttreatment records were reviewed for manifest refraction, unaided visual acuity, keratometric readings, topography, corneal staining, adverse events, and duration of OCR lens wear.

Results. Records of 296 OCR patients were evaluated. One hundred fifty-four (52.0%) patients were 12 years old or younger. Sixty-eight percent of all patients in the study were Asian, and almost 95% of the patients aged 12 years or younger were Asian. The patients aged 12 years or younger had a mean original spherical equivalent refractive error of −3.50 ± 1.50 diopters (D). The patients older than 12 years had a mean original spherical equivalent refractive error of −3.20 ± 1.50 D. Refractive changes were similar between the group aged 12 years or younger and the group older than 12 years (3.30 ± 1.40 D vs. 3.10 ± 1.40 D) (P=0.14). The mean unaided, binocular logMAR visual acuity was 0.03 ± 0.06 (i.e., 20/20−1) for the group aged 12 years or younger and 0.02 ± 0.07 (i.e., 20/20−1) for the group older than 12 years. There were three adverse events during the study that did not result in a loss of best-corrected visual acuity. A total of 507 patient-years of wear was represented in the study.

Conclusions. OCR resulted in comparable safety and efficacy in temporarily reducing myopia for children younger than 12 years as it is for children older than 12 years and adults.

From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, MI.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. M.J. Lipson, 19900 Haggerty Rd. #111, Livonia, MI 48152.

Accepted May 16, 2007.

© 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.