Secondary Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Nurse and Nurse Student Attitudes and Perceived Self-efficacy in Use of Information and Communication Technologies

Professional and Cultural Differences

Warshawski, Sigalit, PhD, RN; Itzhaki, Michal, PhD, RN; Barnoy, Sivia, PhD, RN

CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing: January 2019 - Volume 37 - Issue 1 - p 20–28
doi: 10.1097/CIN.0000000000000470
FEATURES

Information and communication technologies have become essential and design-effective tools in the global healthcare system. Evidence suggests that information and communication technologies can promote nursing practice and patient satisfaction and quality of care. Competency with information and communication technologies is essential for both nurses and nursing students, and attitudes toward its use and perceived self-efficacy are important for implementation in the workplace. This study aimed to explore nurse and nursing student attitudes and perceived self-efficacy regarding information and communication technologies use in clinical practice and to examine professional and cultural differences between these groups in their attitudes and perceived self-efficacy in information and communication technologies use. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Israeli nursing students (n = 144) and registered nurses (n = 104). The findings revealed that respondents held overall positive attitudes toward information and communication technologies' use in clinical practice and perceived themselves as competent in this context. Significant differences were found between nurses and students in their attitudes toward information and communication technologies and information and communication technologies self-efficacy. Cultural group (Jewish/Arab) was found related to positive attitudes toward use of information and communication technologies in clinical practice. Nurse educators and managers should be aware of the potential impact of cultural and professional differences on the adoption and implementation of information and communication technologies and should institute initiatives within the organization and academia to manage cultural and professional discrepancies.

Author Affiliations: Nursing Department, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

This study did not receive any specific grant or funding support.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationships with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

Corresponding author: Sigalit Warshawski, PhD, RN, Nursing Department, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 69978 (sigalwar@post.tau.ac.il).

Copyright © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.