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The Relationship Between Acceptance Intention Toward a Smartphone Healthcare Application and Health-Promoting Behaviors Among Nursing Students

Choi, Eun-Jin, PhD, RN; Kang, Se-Won, PhD, RN

CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing: October 2018 - Volume 36 - Issue 10 - p 494–500
doi: 10.1097/CIN.0000000000000433
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The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between acceptance intention toward a smartphone healthcare application and health-promoting behaviors among nursing students in order to propose a method to encourage nursing students' personal health management. Data were collected from June to July 2015 in two cities located in South Korea, targeting 450 nursing students. There was a weak positive relationship between acceptance intention toward a smartphone healthcare application and health-promoting behaviors (r = 0.281, P < .001). There were differences in health-promoting behaviors according to the level of acceptance intention toward a smartphone healthcare application: health-promoting behavior scores for the upper 50% of participants with higher intention scores (high-score group) were statistically higher than those for the lower 50% of participants (low-score group) (t = 4.247, P < .001). In the logistic regression, the high-score group had a greater likelihood of performing health-promoting behaviors (odds ratio, 2.260; P < .001, 95% confidence interval, 1.539–3.321). Health-promoting behaviors tended to increase among nursing students when the acceptance intention toward a smartphone healthcare application was high. To increase nursing students' intention to accept a smartphone healthcare application, it is necessary to develop applications featuring diverse, interesting health-related content suitable for their needs, so that they want to use these applications to promote health.

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing, Ulsan College (Dr Choi), Ulsan; and Department of Nursing, Dongseo University (Dr Kang), Busan, South Korea.

This work was supported by the 2015 Research Fund of Ulsan College.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationships with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

Corresponding author: Eun-Jin Choi, PhD, RN, Department of Nursing, Ulsan College, 101 Bongsu-ro, Dong-gu, Ulsan 44022, South Korea (ejchoi@uc.ac.kr).

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