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Clinical Investigations

Evaluation of Vasopressor Exposure and Mortality in Patients With Septic Shock*

Roberts, Russel J. PharmD, FCCM1; Miano, Todd A. PharmD, PhD, FCCM2; Hammond, Drayton A. PharmD, MBA, MSc, FCCM3; Patel, Gourang P. PharmD, MSc, FCCM4; Chen, Jen-Ting MD5; Phillips, Kristy M. PharmD1; Lopez, Natasha PharmD1; Kashani, Kianoush MD, MSc6,7; Qadir, Nida MD8; Cairns, Charles B. MD9; Mathews, Kusum MD, MPH, MSCR10; Park, Pauline MD, FCCM11; Khan, Akram MD12; Gilmore, James F. PharmD13; Brown, Anne Rain Tanner PharmD14; Tsuei, Betty MD, FCCM15; Handzel, Michele PharmD16; Chang, Alfredo Lee MD17; Duggal, Abhijit MD18; Lanspa, Michael MD, MS, FCCM19; Herbert, James Taylor MD, PhD20; Martinez, Anthony MD21; Tonna, Joseph MD22; Ammar, Mahmoud A. PharmD23; Nazer, Lama H. PharmD, FCCM24; Heavner, Mojdeh PharmD25; Pender, Erin PharmD26; Chambers, Lauren PharmD27; Kenes, Michael T. PharmD28; Kaufman, David MD29; Downey, April PharmD30; Brown, Brent MD31; Chaykosky, Darlene PharmD32; Wolff, Armand MD33; Smith, Michael PharmD34; Nault, Katie PharmD, MBA35; Gong, Michelle N. MD, MS5; Sevransky, Jonathan E. MD, MHS, FCCM36; Lat, Ishaq PharmD, FCCM37; on behalf of the Observation of VariatiOn in fLUids adMinistEred in shock-CHaracterizAtion of vaSoprEssor Requirements in Shock (VOLUME-CHASERS) Study Group and SCCM Discovery Network

Author Information
doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000004476

Abstract

Sepsis is a life-threatening syndrome caused by a dysregulated host response to infection that may progress to fatal shock and results in greater than 5 million annual deaths worldwide (1,2). Prioritizing timely interventions to restore adequate perfusion have been demonstrated to improve morbidity and mortality (3–6). Guideline recommendations for the early treatment of septic shock recommend 30 mL/kg of fluid resuscitation followed by additional fluid or vasopressor therapy if initial fluid resuscitation is inadequate to restore and maintain cellular perfusion (7). Although vasopressor therapy is commonly used in the treatment of septic shock, there is wide variation in the selection, sequence of initiation, and titration of vasoactive agents (4,8–13). Additionally, there is increasing discussion that individual patients may benefit from a tailored vasopressor treatment strategy (14).

Although fluids and vasopressors are recognized as essential components of resuscitation (7), the optimal timing and dosing of each treatment for patients with septic shock remain unknown. Substantial data have linked excessive fluid administration to worse outcomes (e.g., acute kidney injury, days in organ failure, mortality) (15–22), leading some investigators to explore early fluid minimization strategies, in particular the early, and possibly preferential use of vasopressors (13,23). However, excessive vasopressor exposure has also been linked to worse outcomes, and there are several potential adverse effects that may be vasopressor dosage related (e.g., arrhythmia, splanchnic perfusion deficits) (24–27). Furthermore, it is plausible that the effects of the two resuscitation treatments interact. That is, the effect of vasopressors on hemodynamics and outcome depends on the fluid status at the time of vasopressor administration. Few studies have examined this important question.

The goals of this study were to characterize vasopressor therapy in the early phases of septic shock resuscitation and to determine its association with mortality. Given the critical time-dependence of sepsis therapies, we focused analysis on the first 6 and 24 hours of sepsis resuscitation. We quantified vasopressor dosing intensity (VDI) as the total vasopressor dose infused across all vasopressors in norepinephrine equivalents (NEE). Using this definition, we aimed to 1) determine the association between VDI during the first 6 hours and first 24 hours after the onset of septic shock and 30-day in-hospital mortality; 2) determine whether the effect of VDI varies depending on fluid resuscitation volume; and 3) determine whether the effect of VDI varies depending on the pattern of dosing titration.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

CHaracterizAtion of vaSoprEssor Requirements in Shock (CHASERS) study is a prospectively defined substudy of Observation of VariatiOn in fLUids adMinistEred in shock-CHaracterizAtion of vaSoprEssor Requirements in Shock (VOLUME-CHASERS) a multicenter, prospective, observational study, conducted through the Discovery Network, the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s research network (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03190408) (Protocol S1, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). From September 1, 2017, to February 1, 2018, consecutive adults (≥ 18 yr) admitted to a United States (n = 32) or Jordanian (n = 1) study hospital with shock were enrolled over a 2–4-week period. Patients could be enrolled from any floor within the institution if there were plans to transfer to an ICU. Shock was defined as meeting one of the following criteria: 1) need for vasopressor therapy (at any infusion dose) to maintain a mean arterial pressure (MAP) greater than 65 mm Hg or 2) systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg, with shock onset defined as the date and time of when the first criterion was met. Patients were excluded if they: 1) were in the operating room at the time of shock onset; 2) were admitted to an ICU after cardiac surgery with cardiogenic shock as the primary etiology of shock; 3) were transferred from another hospital or emergency department (ED) to a study hospital; or 4) were previously enrolled in the study. Patients in the CHASERS substudy were restricted to those with septic shock that were treated with appropriate initial antibiotics and greater than or equal to 1 vasopressor within 24 hours after shock onset. The diagnosis of septic shock was made at each study site by treating clinicians in accordance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign international guideline definitions (7). CHASERS’ patients were additionally excluded if their resuscitation involved mechanical support (e.g., extracorporeal life support) and if there was missing vasopressor dose or covariate data. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at all 33 participating hospitals. The requirement for informed consent was waived by all centers. No external funding was provided for this study.

Data Collection

We collected baseline demographics, shock etiology, medication history, comorbidities, location of shock onset, and ICU type. Variables needed to calculate the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were collected during the time period from 12 hours before to 12 hours after shock onset. During the 24-hour period following shock onset, summary measures of resuscitation treatments were collected for the following time periods: hour 0–3, 3–6, 6–12, and 12–24. Fluid administration was collected as the total volume administered during each time period (crystalloid, colloid, packed RBCs, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets). Vasopressor administration was collected as the maximum and minimum infusion dose administered during each time period (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, phenylephrine, and vasopressin). Mechanical ventilation was collected as being ventilated versus not ventilated, for any length of time, during each time period. The use of renal replacement therapy during the first 24 hours was collected. Patients were followed until hospital discharge or death, whichever came first. In-hospital mortality was determined through medical record review. Training on data collection procedures was provided by the study’s executive committee to each site. De-identified site data were uploaded into a secure online form using Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) (https://project-redcap.org) electronic data capture tools (28).

Exposures

The primary exposure was VDI, quantified as the total vasopressor dose infused across all vasopressors in NEE and expressed in μg/min (8,29). We chose μg/min (as opposed to μg/kg/min) because the majority of study centers (21/33, 64%) used μg/min for norepinephrine dosing. VDI was determined by first taking the average of the lowest and highest infusion dose documented for each vasopressor at each time period, and then calculating the corresponding NEE for that time period for each vasopressor administered. This calculation assumes that the patient was maintained at a constant infusion dose midway between the lowest and highest infusion doses over each time period. We assumed a flat dose of 0.04 U/min for intervals where vasopressin was administered. Once VDI was obtained for each time period (hour 0–3, 3–6, 6–12, and 12–24), we calculated the cumulative average VDI at 6 and 24 hours by taking a time-weighted average of VDI from 0 to 6 hours and 0–24 hours. Similarly, the cumulative volume of fluid administration was tabulated for the time periods from 0 to 6 hours and 0–24 hours. In a secondary analysis that aimed to examine the timing of vasopressor titration, we categorized VDI for the time periods of 0–6 and 0–24 hours as low-dose (VDI < 15 μg/min NEE) or high-dose (VDI ≥ 15 μg/min NEE) (8). We then classified the VDI across the two time periods into four categories: 1) “never high” (VDI was < 15 μg/min NEE for both time periods); 2) “early high and late low“ (VDI was ≥ 15 μg/min NEE during the first 6 hr but titrated < 15 μg/min NEE by the end of the 24 hr period); 3) “early low and late high” (VDI was < 15 μg/min NEE for the first 6 hr but titrated ≥ 15 μg/min NEE by the end of the 24 hr period); and 4) “always high” (VDI was ≥ 15 μg/min NEE during the first 6 hr and remained elevated for the entire 24 hr period).

Statistical Analysis

The association between VDI and in-hospital mortality at 30 days was modeled using multivariable logistic regression, with separate models constructed for VDI at 0–6 hours and VDI at 0–24 hours. Each model examined potential interaction between VDI and fluid administration by testing interaction terms using the likelihood ratio test. Significant interactions were visualized with plots of the population average marginal mortality estimates for various combinations of fluid volume and VDI (30). In a secondary analysis, an additional model was constructed to examine the association between VDI titration and in-hospital mortality at 30 days. All models were adjusted for potential confounding variables that were selected a priori based on clinical knowledge and prior literature (31): age, sex, APACHE III score, need for mechanical ventilation, corticosteroid administration, location of shock onset, hospital length of stay prior to shock onset, treating ICU type, and past medical history (heart failure, diabetes mellitus, renal disease [with and without dialysis], liver disease, metastatic cancer, and hematologic malignancy). To account for the potential effects of body size, all models adjusted for height and weight.

Sensitivity Analyses

We adjusted for potential center effects by repeating all models using random-effects logistic regression (32,33), with center specified as a random intercept. To determine whether results were sensitive to our choice of vasopressor dosing unit, we repeated analyses using weight-based VDI (μg/kg/min) (34). Because data on baseline MAP and fluid administration was not available for all subjects, these variables were not included in the primary analysis models. However, we repeated all analyses in the subset of patients with baseline fluid administration data available (n = 386), with baseline MAP (n = 476), and with both variables (n = 385). Last, we repeated the analysis after restricting patients surviving the initial 24-hour period (n = 607) to evaluate potential survival bias. All statistical analyses were performed using STATA release 14.2 (StataCorp LLC, College Station, TX).

RESULTS

Patient Characteristics

The VOLUME-CHASERS study enrolled 1,639 patients, and after excluding patients without septic shock or vasopressor therapy, the CHASERS study included 616 patients (Fig. S1, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). Baseline demographics are reported in Table 1 and Table S1 (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). Patients were most often diagnosed with septic shock in the ED, had a high severity of illness (APACHE III score 97 [± sd 28]), and were most often admitted to a medical or mixed medical/surgical ICU. In-hospital mortality at 30 days was 31%.

TABLE 1. - Baseline Demographics and Outcomes
Characteristic Result
Age, yr, mean (sd) 63.8 (15.3)
Weight, kg, mean (sd)a 81.8 (28.7)
Male, n (%) 337 (54.7)
Race, n (%)
 Caucasian 369 (59.9)
 African American 109 (17.7)
 Other 32 (5.2)
 Not reported 106 (17.2)
Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III, mean (sd) 96.5 (28.2)
Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, median (IQR) 9 (7–12)
Lactate, mg/dL, median (IQR)
 Highest in the perishock periodb,c 3.2 (1.8–6)
 Highest in the 0–24 hr after shock onsetd 2.8 (1.6–5.2)
Location at start of shock, n (%)
 Emergency department 273 (44.3)
 ICU 213 (34.6)
 Floor 112 (18.2)
 Postanesthesia care unit 4 (0.6)
 Other 14 (2.3)
ICU type, n (%)
 Medical 342 (55.5)
 Medical/surgical 139 (22.6)
 Surgical 55 (8.9)
 Cardiothoracic 33 (5.4)
 Other 47 (7.6)
LOS prior to shock onset, d, n (%)
 0–2 425 (69)
 3–7 90 (14.6)
 8–14 46 (7.5)
 > 14 55 (8.9)
Mechanical ventilation within first 24 hr, n (%) 382 (62)
ICU LOS, d, median (IQR)a 6 (3–11)
Hospital LOS, d, median (IQR)a 13 (7–22.5)
In-hospital mortality at 30 d, n (%)e 191 (31)
IQR = interquartile range, LOS = length of stay.
an = 3 missing values.
bn = 50 missing values.
cHighest lactate in the perishock period is defined as the highest lactate in the 12 hr before and 12 hr following shock onset.
dn = 52 missing values.
eThe number of patients who died within 24 hr was nine of 616 (1.5%). The number of patients who died within 48 hr was 30 of 616 (4.9%).

Vasopressor and Fluid Administration Data

Table 2 reports vasopressor and fluid data. Patients received a median of 1,160 mL (interquartile range [IQR], 548–2,226 mL) of IV fluid during the 12 hours before shock onset and a median of 3,400 mL (IQR, 1,851–5,338 mL) during the 24 hours after shock diagnosis. Individual fluid amounts are reported in Table S2 (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). Crystalloids were the predominant fluid administered at all time periods. The most common vasopressor was norepinephrine (93%), followed by vasopressin (39%), phenylephrine (18.5%), epinephrine (10%), and dopamine (6%). The number of vasopressors administered increased over time within the first 24 hours after shock onset (Fig. 1). The median vasopressor infusion dose administered during the first 24 hours was 8.5 μg/min NEE (IQR, 3.4–18.1 μg/min NEE). Individual vasopressor infusion doses for each period are reported in Table S2 (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). High-dose vasopressor support was required in 31% of patients. Compared to low-dose vasopressor support, the high-dose group had a higher APACHE III score, SOFA score, and mortality (Table S3, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). MAP was consistently above 65 mm Hg during the first 24 hours after shock in both the high-dose and low-dose groups (Fig. S2, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610).

TABLE 2. - Vasopressor, Fluid, and Ancillary Medication Administration Data
Characteristic Result (n = 616)
Vasopressor dataa,b
Vasopressor use, n (%)
  Norepinephrine 573 (93)
  Vasopressin 237 (38.5)
  Phenylephrine 114 (18.5)
  Epinephrine 63 (10.2)
  Dopamine 38 (6.2)
 Total vasopressor amount (mg NEE)
  0–24 hr 12.2 (4.9–26)
Vasopressor infusion dose (μg/min NEE)
  0–3 hr, n = 402 8.8 (5–17.5)
  3–6 hr, n = 454 10 (5–19.8)
  6–12 hr, n = 509 10.7 (5–23)
  12–24 hr, n = 517 10.4 (5–23.8)
  0–24 hr, n = 616 8.5 (3.4–18.1)
 High vasopressor infusion dose use (rate ≥ 15 μg/min NEE) 190 (30.8)
Fluid dataa,b
 Preshock fluid (12 hr prior to shock onset), mL, n = 373 1,160 (548–2,226)
 Total fluidc,d, mL
  0–3 hr, n = 479 1,100 (500–2,000)
  3–6 hr, n = 427 500 (215–1,000)
  6–12 hr, n = 488 805.5 (398.5–1,297.3)
  12–24 hr, n = 495 1,100 (587–2,000)
  Total over 24 hr, n = 582 3,400 (1,851.8–5,337.5)
Other medicationsa,b
 Hydrocortisone use (≥ 200 mg/d), n (%) 180 (29.2)
 Propofol or dexmedetomidine use, n (%)
  0–3 hr 183 (29.7)
  3–6 hr 181 (29.4)
  6–12 hr 225 (36.5)
  12–24 hr 249 (40.4)
  Ever received within first 24 hr 303 (49.2)
NEE = norepinephrine equivalents.
aTimeframe is within the first 24 hr of shock onset unless otherwise stated.
bData presented as median (interquartile range) unless otherwise stated.
cCrystalloid plus colloid fluid plus blood product fluid volume.
dBlood product fluid volume consists of packed RBCs, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma.

Figure 1.
Figure 1.:
Vasopressor count over time (n = 616).

Outcome Analysis

In the analysis of the 0–6-hour time period, increasing VDI was associated with increased odds of 30-day inpatient mortality (Fig. 2). However, the strength of this association varied depending on the amount of concomitant fluid administration during the 0–6-hour period. As fluid volume increased, the association between VDI and increased mortality was attenuated, such that no significant association between VDI and mortality was observed when the 0–6-hour fluid volume was at least 2,000 mL (Fig. 2; and Tables S4 and S5, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610).

Figure 2.
Figure 2.:
Predicted mortality across categories of fluid and vasopressor exposure intensity at 0–6 hr after shock onset. Mortality estimates are derived from a logistic regression model of cumulative fluid administration and average vasopressor dose (in norepinephrine equivalents) during the initial 6-hr period after shock onset. There was a significant interaction between vasopressor exposure and fluid administration (Likelihood ratio test p = 0.019). The model is adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, mechanical ventilation, corticosteroid administration, location of shock onset, hospital length of stay prior to shock onset, treating ICU type, heart failure, metastatic cancer, diabetes mellitus, hematologic cancer, renal disease, and liver disease. The corresponding odds ratios for vasopressor and fluids are shown in Table S4 (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610).

In the analysis of the 0–24-hour time period, increasing VDI was associated with increased odds of 30-day inpatient mortality, but this association did not vary depending on fluid resuscitation volume over the 0–24-hour period: every 10 μg/min increase in average VDI over the 24-hour period was associated with 33% increased odds of 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.16–1.53) (Table S4 and Fig. S3, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). In the analysis of VDI titration, we observed an association between high-dose vasopressor exposure that varied depending on the titration pattern. In the unadjusted analysis (Fig. 3), patients who exhibited a VDI pattern of early high/late low had a lower associated mortality rate compared with those patients with VDI patterns of early low/late high and sustained high dose. This pattern of results remained after adjustment for potential confounding variables (Table S3, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). Primary and secondary analysis results were similar in random-effects analyses, in those adjusted for baseline MAP and fluid administration, and in those that were restricted to the population surviving the first 24 hours after shock onset (Table S6, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610). Last, our results were similar in an analysis based on μg/kg/min rather than μg/min VDI (Table S7, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/CCM/F610).

Figure 3.
Figure 3.:
Mortality stratified by vasopressor dose categories at 0–6 and 0–24 hr. Vasopressor dosing intensity (VDI) was categorized for the time periods of 0–6 and 0–24 hr as low-dose vasopressor infusion (VDI < 15 μg/min norepinephrine equivalents [NEE]) or high-dose vasopressor infusion (VDI ≥ 15 μg/min NEE). We then classified the VDI across the two time periods into four categories: 1) never high (VDI was < 15 μg/min NEE for both time periods); 2) early high and late low (VDI was ≥ 15 μg/min NEE during the first 6 hr but titrated < 15 μg/min NEE by the end of the 24 hr period); 3) early low and late high (VDI was < 15 μg/min NEE for the first 6 hr but titrated ≥ 15 μg/min NEE by the end of the 24 hr period); and 4) always high (VDI was ≥ 15 μg/min NEE during the first 6 hr and remained elevated for the entire 24 hr period). Model is adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, mechanical ventilation, corticosteroid administration, location of shock onset, hospital length of stay prior to shock onset, treating ICU type, heart failure, metastatic cancer, diabetes mellitus, hematologic cancer, renal disease, and liver disease. Applying the Bonferroni correction, the alpha level for pairwise comparisons is set at 0.0083. The number of patients who died within 24 hr was nine of 616 (1.5%).

DISCUSSION

In this multicenter, observational study of septic shock care, we found that increasing VDI during the first 24 hours after the shock was associated with increased mortality risk. Notably, we observed an interaction between VDI and fluid administration during the first 6 hours of shock resuscitation, with the association between VDI and mortality attenuated by increasing volumes of fluid administration. This interaction was no longer apparent when the analysis focused on the entire 24-hour period. We also found that brief, early high VDI exposure was associated with lower mortality compared to later and sustained VDI exposure. Taken together, we hypothesize that early aggressive vasopressor titration may be preferred compared to slower titration to high doses, but that this strategy must be accompanied by adequate fluid resuscitation in the early hours after shock onset to avoid potential deleterious effects of high-dose vasopressors. If true, this hypothesis has important implications, given the recent interest in early vasopressors to prevent excessive fluid resuscitation (9,13,23,35). Although our results suggest that the effects of vasopressors may depend on volume status, the observational nature of our study precludes examination of potential interaction mechanisms, and we consider our results hypothesis-generating only.

Common strategies for vasopressor initiation and dosing include starting norepinephrine at a moderate dose and increasing the dose gradually to achieve a goal MAP. Another common strategy is to administer incremental boluses of fluids while gradually increasing the vasopressor dose to achieve a goal MAP. However, both of these methods may postpone the recognition of “refractory shock” and delay optimization of tissue perfusion. An alternative approach may be to start norepinephrine at a higher dose and reduce the dose after achieving goal MAP, thereby decreasing the time to goal MAP. Further study is needed comparing vasopressor dosing and titration to expand upon our observations.

The harms of excess fluid administration have been extensively described (15–22). As a result, there has been increasing interest in the use of fluid restrictive strategies during the early phases of septic shock, combined with earlier and more aggressive vasopressor support (9,13,23,35). Although such approaches have a physiologic rationale (35), our data suggest that there is some minimum threshold of fluid administration that is required in patients treated with vasopressors during the first hours after shock onset. Our findings are in agreement with previous data that has linked the early administration of vasopressors in lieu of fluid therapy with increased mortality (10). Although our data does not identify a threshold for “adequate fluid resuscitation,” increasing VDI during the first 6 hours was no longer associated with mortality when fluid resuscitation was at least 2 L (~25 mL/kg). Notably, this amount is substantially less than the median fluid volumes in several studies of early goal-directed therapy (5–6 L over 6 hr) (35). Ultimately, achieving an optimal balance between fluids and vasopressors will need to consider both the timing of these interventions and the need to provide individualized therapy.

Our study has limitations. Observational studies are susceptible to confounding, such that patients who required higher VDI exposures had a higher baseline risk for mortality. We addressed this concern by adjusting for an extensive set of potential confounding variables, including age, APACHE III score, need for mechanical ventilation, and comorbid chronic disease. In addition, we conducted multiple sensitivity analyses, with each showing similar results. Given the nature of the study design, it is possible that patients were identified after the onset of septic shock, although reflective of real-world practice. Additionally, patients were followed until hospital discharge, potentially underestimating the effects on longer-term mortality. Our method for estimating vasopressor dosing relied on summary measures for specific time periods, requiring the assumption that vasopressor dose remained constant for up to 12 hours. This creates the potential for measurement error bias. However, VDI was calculated similarly for all patients, and there is no obvious suggestion that any measurement error would be related to baseline mortality risk. Thus, it is plausible that any measurement error would be nondifferential, which would be expected to bias our point estimates toward the null (36). Additional studies that estimate VDI with hour-to-hour data will be required to validate our findings. Of particular interest would be studies that define additional clinically relevant vasopressor dosing patterns. We did not collect positive end-expiratory pressure values or amount of sedation administered which may have affected MAP and subsequent vasopressor dosing. We did not express fluid volumes or vasopressor doses in weight-based units, as we judged that this better reflects clinical practice in most institutions. However, our regression models include height and weight as covariates, thus controlling for body size in all outcome analyses. Finally, NEE may not represent a precise pharmacological equivalency in individual patients. Nevertheless, this approach facilitated a method to describe the intensity of vasopressor therapy and used a dose conversion that has been described in prior investigations (29).

CONCLUSIONS

Increasing VDI during the first 24 hours after septic shock was associated with increased mortality. This association varied with the amount of early fluid administration and the timing of vasopressor titration.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Observation of VariatiOn in fLUids adMinistEred in shock-CHaracterizAtion of vaSoprEssor Requirements in Shock (VOLUME-CHASERS) Study Group acknowledges the following sites and individuals for their efforts on the project. Sites are organized alphabetically.

Bridgeport Hospital: Tina McCurry, BSN; Brigham and Women’s Hospital: Jeremy R. DeGrado, PharmD, Kevin M. Dube, PharmD, Kenneth E. Lupi, PharmD; Cleveland Clinic Foundation: Andrei Hastings, MD, Omar Mehkri, MD; Duke University School of Medicine: Raquel R. Bartz, MD, MMCi, Angela L. Pollak, MD, Sarah Kendall Smith, MD, PhD; Emory University Hospital/Grady Hospital: Marguerite Stewart, Leona Wells; Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center: Jamie Kerestes, PharmD, Kayla Kotch, Sarah Miller; Intermountain Healthcare: Brent Armbruster, Valerie Aston, MBA, Katie Brown, Mardee Merrill; King Hussein Cancer Center: Nadeen Anabtawi, PharmD; Lahey Hospital & Medical Center: Katie Nault, PharmD; Lake Region Medical Center: Kerri L. Federico, PharmD, Peter-John Trapp, PharmD; Mayo Clinic: Joseph C. Farmer, MD, Pablo Moreno Franco, MD, Shurong Gong, Rahul Kashyap, MBBS, Sidhant Singh; University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: Reagan D. Collins, PharmD; Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine: Jorge Ataucuri-Vargas, MD, Vladyslav Dieiev, MD, Ashley Kang, MD, Ann Wang, MD; Mt Sinai Health System: Neha N. Goel, MD, MSCR; New York University: Oscar Mitchell, MD; Ohio Health/Riverside Methodist Hospital: Jordan DeWitt, PharmD, Alex Heine, PharmD, Abby Tyson, PharmD; Oregon Health and Science University: Dubier Matos, Ebaad Haq; Rush University Medical Center: Katie Dalton, PharmD; St Agnes Hospital: Valentina Amaral, MD, Jasmine Aulakh, MD, Nauman Farooq, MD; Truman Medical Center: Kerra Cissne, PharmD; University of Arizona: Jose Camarena, Alexia Demitsas, Kristen Deupree, Karen Lutrick, PhD; University of Cincinnati: Nora Elson, MS, Dina Gomaa, John Shinn III, Anthony Spuzzillo, Devin Wakefield; University of Maryland: Mehrnaz Pajoumand, PharmD, Sharon Wilson, PharmD, Siu Yan, Amy Yeung, PharmD; University of Michigan: Tina Chen, Sinan Hanna; University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: Lauren Sinko, Kassidy Malone, Deamber Piel; University of Utah: Chloe Skidmore; University California Los Angeles: Matt Flynn, MD, Ji Yeon Seo, MD; University of Rochester Medical Center: Nicole M. Acquisto, PharmD, Kathryn Connor, PharmD, Samantha Delibert, PharmD, Christine Groth, PharmD, Jeff Huntress, PharmD, Gregory Kelly, PharmD, Therese Makhoul, PharmD, Hannah Mierzwa, Stephen Rappaport, PharmD; University of Southern California: Daisy Rios; Vidant Medical Center: Bethany Crouse, PharmD; Wake Forest Baptist Health: Michael Kenes, PharmD; and Yale-New Haven Health: Shamsuddin Akhtar, MD, Abdalla A. Ammar, PharmD.

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Keywords:

fluid; mortality; resuscitation; sepsis; shock; vasopressor

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