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Critical Care Resources in Guangdong Province of China: Three Surveys from 2005 to 2015*

Wu, Jian-Feng MD, PhD1; Pei, Fei MD1; Ouyang, Bin MD, PhD1; Chen, Juan MD1; Li, Yi-Min MD, PhD2; Feng, Yong-Wen MD3; Guo, Fa-Liang MD4; Zhou, Li-Xin MD5; Wang, Zheng MD6; Guo, Ying-Jun MD7; Lin, Qin-Han MD8; Li, Zhan-Peng MD9; Ling, Yun MD10; Li, Li MD11; Deng, Lie-Hua MD12; Zhao, Ying-Ping MD13; Dai, Jian-Wei MD14; Luo, Shu-Yu MD15; Zhou, Dun-Rong MD16; Luo, Wei-Wen MD17; Zhao, Ling MD18; Chen, Wei-Ying MD19; Wang, Wei-Chuan MD20; Cai, Wen-Yang MD21; Luo, Qiong-Xiang MD22; Guan, Xiang-Dong MD, PhD1

doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000002700
Online Clinical Investigations
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Objectives: Data about the critical care resources in China remain scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the variation and distribution of critical care resources in Guangdong province from 2005 to 2015.

Design: Data in regard to critical care resources were collected through questionnaires and visits every 5 years from 2005.

Setting: All hospitals in Guangdong province were screened and hospitals that provide critical care services were enrolled.

Intervention: None.

Measurements and Main Results: One hundred eleven, 158, and 284 hospitals that provide critical care services were enrolled in the three consecutive surveys respectively. The number of ICUs, ICU beds, intensivists, and nurses increased to 324, 3,956, 2,470, and 7,695, respectively, by 2015. Adjusted by population, the number of ICU beds per 100,000 (100,000) population increased by 147.7% from 2005 to 2015, and the number of intensivists and nurses per 100,000 population increased by 35.3% and 55.1% from 2011 to 2015. However, the numbers in the Pearl River Delta, a richer area, were higher than those in the non–Pearl River Delta area (ICU beds: 4.64 vs 2.58; intensivists: 2.90 vs 1.61; nurses: 9.30 vs 4.71 in 2015). In terms of staff training, only 17.85% of intensivists and 14.29% of nurses have completed a formal accredited critical care training program by 2015.

Conclusions: Our study was the first one to investigate the trend and distribution of critical care resources in China. The quantity of ICU beds and staff has been increasing rapidly, but professional training for staff was inadequate. The distribution of critical care resources was unbalanced. Our study can be beneficial for healthcare policymaking and the allocation of critical care resources in Guangdong province and other provinces in China.

1Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.

2Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.

3Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Second People’s Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.

4Department of Critical Care Medicine, Donghua Hospital, Dongguan, Guangdong, China.

5Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First People’s Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, China.

6Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Maoming, Maoming, Guangdong, China.

7Department of Critical Care Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China.

8Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Qingyuan, Qingyuan, Guangdong, China.

9Department of Critical Care Medicine,The First People’s Hospital of Zhaoqing, Zhaoqing, Guangdong, China.

10Department of Critical Care Medicine, Central Hospital of Huizhou, Huizhou, Guangdong, China.

11Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Yuebei, Shaoguan, Guangdong, China.

12Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, The Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, China.

13Department of Critical Care Medicine, Central Hospital of Jiangmen, Jiangmen, Guangdong, China.

14Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong, China.

15Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Jieyang, Jieyang, Guangdong, China.

16Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Yangjiang, Yangjiang, Guangdong, China.

17Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Meizhou, Meizhou, Guangdong, China.

18Department of Critical Care Medicine, The People’s Hospital of Zhuhai, Zhuhai, Guangdong, China.

19Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Yunfu, Yunfu, Guangdong, China.

20Department of Internal Medicine, Pengpai Memorial Hospital, Shanwei, Guangdong, China.

21Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital of Chaozhou, Chaozhou, Guangdong, China.

22Department of Critical Care Medicine, People’s Hospital of Heyuan, Heyuan, Guangdong, China.

*See also p. 2113.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s website (http://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal).

Supported, in part, by Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province (2016A030313269), Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province (2014B090901049), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (15ykpy14).

The authors have disclosed that they do not have any potential conflicts of interest.

For information regarding this article, E-mail: wujianf@mail.sysu.edu.cn; guanxiangdong1962@163.com

Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All Rights Reserved.