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Is a Single Entry Training Scheme for Intensive Care Medicine Both Inevitable and Desirable?*

McLean, Anthony S. MBChB, BSc(Hons), MD, FRACP, FCICM, FCSANZ1,2

doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000001088
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The development of Intensive Care Medicine as a recognizable branch of medicine has been underway for more than half a century, with delivery by a number of different service models. This delivery may be entirely by related medical specialties, such as anesthesiology or pulmonology; alternatively, it may be as a standalone-recognized specialty and frequently by a hybrid of these two extremes. A country may have a completely different delivery model from neighboring countries, and different models may exist within a single country. Debate about the most appropriate method of providing critical care services frequently centers around the training. However, an alternative perspective is that training regimes only follow on from another objective, namely to have Intensive Care Medicine represented in important forums by dedicated critical care physicians. A historical perspective of the development of critical care in two countries over a 40-year period is discussed, whereby a transition from a multiple specialty provision of critical care medicine to that of a single binational pathway occurred. The perceived advantages and disadvantages are outlined, offering insights into how possible future challenges in a highly complex medical specialty can be anticipated and strategies formulated.

1Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Nepean Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

2Nepean Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

*See also p. 2020.

Dr. McLean is employed by the Nepean Hospital. His institution received support for travel from Nepean Institute Critical Care Education and Research.

For information regarding this article, E-mail: anthony.mclean@sydney.edu.au

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