Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Author on Call

The function of the “Author on Call” blog is to allow our readers and authors to interact with each other in a unique way. A few select authors will be chosen to share on the blog aspects of their papers that were especially meaningful to them personally or points that may not have made it into their published report. Readers will then have the opportunity to provide comments and questions, to which the authors will respond.

At times, as seen in our first entry, we will also post separate entries to the blog on various special topics that we feel would be informational or that we welcome your feedback on.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

In 2020, the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife, ISNCC is proud to be hosting the International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN) in London, UK (www.iccn2020.org). As always, the program provides a unique opportunity to share our experiences, knowledge and research. Given the particular significance of 2020 for nurses, this year’s conference will be especially important as we acknowledge the history of ISNCC and deliver a Call to Action to ensure the contribution of nurses to cancer care and control is strengthened in the context of the growing burden of cancer across the world.

As part of the 2020 conference, we will also honour the extraordinary work of three nurses who have made a major difference to cancer care. ISNCC is pleased to announce the recipients of its most prestigious awards.   Professor Theresa Wiseman, Strategic Lead for Applied Health Research at the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Professor of Applied Health Research in Cancer Care at the University of Southampton has been awarded ISNCC’s Distinguished Merit Award. This award is offered once every two years in recognition of an outstanding contribution to the international advancement of the science and art of cancer nursing. Theresa received the award in recognition of her leadership, education and research that has significantly advanced the practice of cancer nursing and the development of cancer nurses. Her work has ensured better outcomes for people affected by cancer across many settings. Dr Lena Sharp, Head of the Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm-Gotland, in Sweden, has been awarded the prestigious Robert Tiffany Lectureship. This lectureship was created to honour the memory of Robert Tiffany, founding member and President of the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care.  Robert Tiffany was an inspiration to many nurses around the world and the intention of the named lecture is to honour those who have a similar capacity to inspire cancer nurses of today and of the future. Dr Sharp is an outstanding nominee for this award, as a professional nurse who in her long career has inspired many nurses both in Sweden and internationally through her roles as an academic supervisor, colleague, leader/manager, and President of the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). ISNCC’s Past President’s award is especially important to the mission of ISNCC, as it is given in recognition of a cancer nurse from a low or middle income country who has initiated and sustained a program of cancer care in her/his country.  The program must have been in place for three or more years and have the potential for replication or adaptation beyond the country’s borders.  This year, Mr David Makumi Kinyanjui, Vice Chair of the Non-Communicable Diseases Alliance of Kenya, is the recipient of this award. David has made significant and unique contributions to shaping cancer nursing in Kenya and the region in his more than 15 years of cancer nursing in clinical practice, policy, and advocacy. He has held dual and unique roles, serving as the chair of the national umbrella body of over 30 cancer associations and patient groups (Kenya Network of Cancer Organizations) until July 2019, as well as being a founding patron of the Oncology Nurses Chapter Kenya.

ISNCC continues to be engaged in a range of initiatives to achieve our mission. We have continued to manage an active portfolio of projects, such as the Eastern European Center of Excellence in Nurses and Tobacco Control and the Cervical & Breast Cancer Screening in Latin America. We continue to build a strong collaboration with the International Council of Nurses (ICN) where we jointly led a project funded by BMS Foundation to develop nurse leadership in cancer control across the world in 2019. We are also working with the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) on World Cancer Day 2020 and the City Cancer Challenge initiatives (C/CAN 2025).


ISNCC is also pleased to announce new initiatives designed to improve the exchange of knowledge about cancer nursing. The ISNCC Editorial Assistance Program (EAP) is a new program that aims to mobilise volunteers to provide editorial support to authors from a non-English speaking background in preparation of their manuscript towards submission to a peer-reviewed journal. This initiative forms part of ISNCC’s efforts to enhance knowledge dissemination at a global level. ISNCC is accepting applications from prospective nurse authors for the initial pilot trial of the program in 2020. Prospective authors need to have a manuscript related to cancer control currently in progress. Please go to the ISNCC Website for further information (www.isncc.org).  

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

We are pleased to inform you that the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care (ISNCC) has created a volunteer editorial assistance service, and this service is available to authors preparing to submit a manuscript to CANCER NURSING. More information can be found below or on ISNCC's blog (http://news.isncc.org/call-for-expressions-of-interest-nurse-authors/).

************************************************************************************************************

Call for Expressions of Interest (Nurse Authors)

The ISNCC Editorial Assistance Program (EAP) is a new program that aims to mobilize volunteers to provide editorial support to authors from a non-English speaking background in preparation of their manuscript towards submission to a peer-reviewed journal. This initiative forms part of ISNCC’s efforts to enhance knowledge dissemination at a global level.

ISNCC is accepting applications from prospective nurse authors for the initial pilot trial of the program in 2020. Prospective authors need to have a manuscript related to cancer control currently in progress.

Eligibility criteria for the author:

  • Be a nurse and member or global citizen of ISNCC;
  • Be from a low- to middle-income country as defined by the World Bank;
  • Reside in a country or region where English is not the primary language;
  • Be able to submit a partially or fully complete draft of the manuscript as part of the application:
    • The content of the manuscript must be directly related to cancer control.
    • For research or quality improvement project reports, the project must be completed prior to applying for the program.
  • Be committed to complete the manuscript over a period of 3-6 months

To express interest, please complete the Online Expression of Interest Form and email your draft manuscript to Professor Ray Chan via email Raymond.Chan@qut.edu.au. Expression of interest applications without a draft manuscript will not be considered.

Deadline for Expression of Interest is 31st January 2020.



Sunday, December 15, 2019

Cancer Patients' Long-term Experiences of Participating in a Comprehensive Lifestyle Intervention Study While Receiving Chemotherapy

Mikkelsen, Hilde Elisabeth Timenes RN, MScH; Vassbakk-Brovold, Karianne PhD; Antonsen, Anne Jørstad RN, MScH; Berntsen, Sveinung PhD; Kersten, Christian MD, PhD; Fegran, Liv RN, PhD

 

"This research encourages the future implementation of lifestyle interventions during cancer treatment, even in cancer patients with advanced disease. We have explored cancer patients' longer-term experiences of participating in a 12-month individualized comprehensive lifestyle intervention study focusing on physical activity, diet, smoking cessation, and stress management while receiving curative or palliative chemotherapy. Our findings indicate that 'gatekeeping' of patients in a palliative setting appears to be unfortunate and suggest that early inclusion to lifestyle interventions of patients treated with both curative and palliative intent is both feasible and desirable. However, while the curative participants' motivation and perceived ability to adhere to lifestyle recommendations increased during the intervention period, the palliative participants' perceived ability to adhere decreased even though they were overall highly motivated. Thus, when implementing lifestyle interventions, we recommend health care professionals keep the patients' motivation, perceived ability to adhere to lifestyle recommendations and individual needs in mind."

 

--Corresponding author Hilde E. Timenes Mikkelsen speaks on her paper, "Cancer Patients' Long-term Experiences of Participating in a Comprehensive Lifestyle Intervention Study While Receiving Chemotherapy," published in CANCER NURSING Volume 43, Issue 1.  For a limited time, the article may be viewed below without a subscription.

Friday, November 1, 2019

The Effect of Uncertainty Management Program on Quality of Life Among Vietnamese Women at 3 Weeks Postmastectomy

Ha, Xuan Thi Nhu PhD; Thanasilp, Sureeporn DNS; Thato, Ratsiri PhD

"This innovative study presents emerging evidence regarding benefits of the Uncertainty Management Plan for improvement in the quality of life for women experiencing mastectomy.  The authors modified the Uncertainty Management plan, based upon Mishel's Uncertainty Theory, for Vietnamese women.  The intervention includes Qigong, a form of complementary or alternative therapy. This culturally appropriate, theoretically based intervention, provided by nurses, may be adapted for utilization internationally potentiating improvement in the quality of life for women experiencing breast cancer.

I have learned how to listen to what women want to share after having a mastectomy. There were many stories behind the women's disease. The program is realistic and concerns holistic care for breast cancer patients. After defining the theoretical framework allied Mishel's Theory, I think the framework is suitable to apply to other groups of patients in Vietnam... I hope I can continue with another project using this program."

 

--Corresponding author Dr Xuan Thi Nhu Ha speaks on her paper, "The Effect of Uncertainty Management Program on Quality of Life Among Vietnamese Women at 3 Weeks Postmastectomy," published in CANCER NURSING Volume 42, Issue 4.  For a limited time, the article may be viewed below without a subscription.

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Dr. Ruth McCorkle, a founding member of the Editorial Board for CANCER NURSING: An International Journal for Cancer Care, died on August 17, 2019 at her home. Tributes citing her well-deserved national and international awards have been distributed by a number of institutions and organizations and we very much appreciate each tribute. Here we speak of Ruth on a personal level. Ruth was a real force of personhood in Oncology and Oncology Nursing. She fully recognized the essential role of oncology nurses at the point of care and spoke to the difference in outcomes for those patients and families who had such care. She was balanced in all of her initiatives between zeal and wisdom, and indefatigable in her efforts. When met with opposition, she would say with good humor, 'they just don't get it' and forward she went. She served as a program reviewer for many of us in our respective settings and would often be heard saying to an institutional leader, 'you really have to get this about oncology nursing.' And there would be the careful bending of the leader to Ruth's slight figure to be certain to hear and have a chance of 'getting it'. The 'it' was what Ruth knew well - that oncology nurses made a positive difference in diminishing suffering – both the physical and existential suffering that can be part of the existence for seriously ill or dying persons. She knew this with complete certainty and advocated for our specialty with data and persuasive personhood.

Ruth was generous professionally and personally and always honest in that generosity. As part of her contributions to CANCER NURSING: An International Journal for Cancer Care, Ruth authored several editorials and INSIGHTs. In the latter, Ruth shared the experience of being accused and cleared of misconduct by a student ('Can mentoring and collaboration lead to a charge of plagiarism?'), of experiencing cancer herself more than once ('Once a nurse, always a nurse'), of caring for a nurse who was her oncology nurse and learning of the untimely death of that nurse ('When staff die suddenly before the stage 4 cancer patient'), and in her most recent INSIGHTS, of experiencing dying ('Trusting the GPS: Going Home'). Few others would consider being generous in such a way that was revealing to such an extent about self. But Ruth chose to be generous and honest in the belief that such sharing might be of help to another in need.

Ruth provided mentorship, collegiality, and collaboration to those that she worked with. She enjoyed making sure her mentees were successful and she formed lasting and deep connections with many of them. Her passion to make a difference in the lives of patients and their families had an impact on everyone she worked with. It was our honor to be her colleague and friend, and to write manuscripts, book chapters, grants, and undertake trials together. Ruth was the quintessential colleague; she was always open to others' work and was selfless in giving of her time. Ruth was there to discuss the first spark of an idea, to question premises, to enrich those ideas and to see them through to the last draft of a manuscript or grant application. You could talk to Ruth anytime, email her, send your drafts; she always considered them carefully and her feedback was generous, invaluable, and prompt. In difficult moments when you were filled with doubt and questioning, Ruth would critique your work and offer her support. It can be very difficult to find such collegiality that is honest, insightful, and enduring. Ruth will be very missed. We hope that her professional persona will be carried on by those who knew and recognized her as the consummate colleague.

Ruth's contributions to science, the nursing profession and oncology changed lives of students, clinicians, faculty educators, researchers, and of cancer patients and their families. We can honor her far-reaching legacy by taking cancer nursing research, education and care to new heights for patients and their families living with cancer.

 

Our very best,


Pamela S. Hinds, PhD, RN, FAAN

Editor-in-Chief

 

Barbara Given, PhD, RN, FAAN

Editorial Board Member