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Sociodemographic Predictors of Anal Cancer Screening and Follow-up in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Individuals

Wells, Jessica S. PhD, RN; Holstad, Marcia M. PhD, FNP, FAANP, FAAN; Watkins Bruner, Deborah PhD, RN, FAAN

doi: 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000524
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Background: Anal cancer in the United States is generally rare; however, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals are 28 times more likely to be given a diagnosis of anal cancer than the general population.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the rates and sociodemographic predictors of anal cancer screening and follow-up anoscopy in a sample of HIV-infected individuals.

Methods: Data for this study (n = 200) were derived from a retrospective chart review of randomly selected HIV-infected individuals. Data analyses included Pearson's correlation coefficient statistic to examine bivariate associations and logistic regression modeling for prediction of anal Papanicolaou test screening and follow-up anoscopy.

Results: Screening rates and follow-up after an abnormal anal Pap test were low. Women were less likely to be screened for anal cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.244; P = .007). Men who have sex with men were almost 4 times more likely to be screened for anal cancer (OR, 3.7; P = .02). Men who have sex with men were 6 times more likely to have follow-up after an abnormal anal Pap test compared with heterosexual men or women of any sexual orientation (OR, 6.88; P = .002).

Conclusions: High-risk groups for anal cancer should be targeted for preventative measures as part of a cancer prevention plan to decrease the personal and clinical burden associated with anal cancer.

Implications for Practice: Cancer prevention is a multistep process that requires screening and follow-up efforts, where healthcare providers play a vital role in these efforts. Findings from this study can inform strategies to improve screening and follow-up rates in HIV-infected individuals.

Author Affiliation: Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

This work was supported by NINR/NIH under grant NR008094 and under Emory University Center for AIDS Research under grant P30 AI050409.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Correspondence: Jessica S. Wells, PhD, RN, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Rd, Rm 230, Atlanta, GA 30322 (jholme3@emory.edu).

Accepted for publication May 10, 2017.

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