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Risk of intraarticular steroid injection before total hip arthroplasty

Croft, Stephen; Rockwood, Peter

doi: 10.1097/BCO.0b013e3182847788
ORIGINAL RESEARCH
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Background Intraarticular steroid injection has been widely used by orthopaedic surgeons as an alternative to surgery and as a diagnostic tool. An association between infection after total hip arthroplasty and intraarticular steroid injection has been reported, particularly when the injections occur within 6 weeks of the operation. Given that recent recommendations by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International continue to endorse the use of intraarticular steroid injection, this study was used to further analyze the risk of intraarticular steroid injection before total hip arthroplasty.

Methods Ninety-six hips that underwent total hip arthroplasty were retrospectively reviewed. Matched cohorts were established; one in which patients received intraarticular steroid injection before total hip arthroplasty and one in which patients did not.

Results No significant difference was found between groups, and no correlation with regards to timing of injection was found.

Conclusions These findings suggest that there is no contraindication for administration of intraarticular steroids before total hip arthroplasty.

Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL

Financial Disclosure: Dr Croft received a student grant and travel assistance from Memorial University of Newfoundland. The remaining author declares no conflicts of interest.

Correspondence to Stephen Croft, MD, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 342 Penneywell Rd, St. John's, NL, Canada, A1E 1V9; Tel: 709-699-5756; fax: 709-753-2671; e-mail: scroft@mun.ca

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.