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Midfoot trauma

Pylawka, Tamara; Andersen, Lucille B

Current Orthopaedic Practice: May 2008 - Volume 19 - Issue 3 - p 228–233
doi: 10.1097/BCO.0b013e3282f52c0a
SPECIAL FOCUS: Ankle and Foot
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Purpose of review The goal of this article is to present a synopsis regarding diagnosis and treatment of midfoot trauma, including navicular fractures, tarsometatarsal (Lisfranc) fractures, and cuneiform/cuboid complex fractures.

Recent findings Over the last few years limited research has been conducted regarding midfoot trauma. The most focused area of interest is Lisfranc injuries. Open reduction and internal fixation have provided better long-term outcomes than nonoperative or Kirschner wire placement in Lisfranc injuries.

Summary The midfoot has a unique set of mechanics: no bony weight-bearing contact with the ground secondary to its relative immobility when compared with the forefoot and hindfoot. Treatment of midfoot injuries is important to maintain the structural integrity of the five midfoot bones relative to one another in order to preserve the rigidity of the midfoot. In addition, the normal weight-bearing relationship of the hindfoot and forefoot also should be maintained to retain the mechanics of normal gait. As the population ages, more people will be living longer after these injuries. The possibility of morbidity due to posttraumatic arthritis could affect livelihood and productivity. This article systematically reviews midfoot injuries, focusing on diagnosis and treatment.

Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Penn State College of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA

Correspondence to Lucille B. Andersen, MD, Assistant Professor, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Penn State College of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850, USA Tel: +1 717 531 1895; fax: +1 717 531 7583; e-mail: landersen@hmc.psu.edu

© 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.