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Interrater and Intrarater Reliability of Silhouette Wound Imaging Device

Miller, Charne GDip(SocStat); Karimi, Leila PhD; Donohue, Lisa PhD; Kapp, Suzanne MNSci

doi: 10.1097/01.ASW.0000422626.25031.b8
FEATURES: ORIGINAL INVESTIGATIONS
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OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the interrater and intrarater reliability of a wound imaging and measurement system called SilhouetteMobile.

DESIGN: Interrater and intrarater reliability study.

SETTING: Community nursing, Victoria, Australia.

PARTICIPANTS: Seven community nurses including Wound Management Clinical Nurse Consultants and Wound Resource Nurses.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Average wound surface area of 14 wound images as captured using a wound imaging and measurement system called SilhouetteMobile.

MAIN RESULTS: High interrater and intrarater reliability were maintained across different users and different assessments by the same user and were also found to be unaffected by image quality. Reliability was poor when tracing small wounds.

CONCLUSION: Silhouette is a highly reliable tool for wound imaging and measurement, although reliability is reduced when annotating small wound areas.

This study investigates the interrater and intrarater reliability of a wound imaging and measurement system called SilhouetteMobile.

Charne Miller, GDip(SocStat), is a Research Officer, Royal District Nursing Service, Helen Macpherson Smith Institute of Community Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Leila Karimi, PhD, is a Lecturer, School of Public Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Lisa Donohue, PhD, is General Manager, and Suzanne Kapp, MNSci, is Clinical Nurse Consultant, Wound Management and Research, Royal District Nursing Service, Helen Macpherson Smith Institute of Community Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The authors have disclosed that they have no financial relationships related to this article.

Acknowledgments: The Project Team acknowledges the Gandel Charitable Trust for funding this investigation, the nurses who participated in this evaluation and kindly shared their time and experience, and the clients who consented to having an image of their wound taken. Home and community care services provided by Royal District Nursing Service are jointly funded by the Victorian and Australian Governments.

Submitted June 28, 2011; accepted August 17, 2011.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.