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Abstracts: ASAIO Bioengineering/tissue Engineering Abstracts

PREDICTION OF OXYGENATION, HEMOLYSIS AND THROMBOSIS IN BLOOD MEMBRANE OXYGENATORS USING COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

Zhang, J1; Nolan, T D1; Griffith, B P1; Wu, Z J1

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The fundamental engineering problems to develop a functional and biocompatible blood oxygenating device involve optimizing the flow path to efficiently transfer gas between blood and gas phases, to reduce pressure drop, and to minimize flow-induced blood trauma and thrombosis. All of them are closely related to the local fluid dynamics. It is difficult to experimentally investigate the effects of fiber buddle and device structure on localized blood flow, gas transfer and biocompatibility due to their complex structure of contemporary hollow fiber membrane oxygenators. To obviate these difficulties, we developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based mathematical models to predict gas transfer, shear-induced hemolysis and thrombosis in hollow fiber membrane blood oxygenators. The gas transfer model includes transport between blood and gas phases, oxygen binding to hemoglobin and reaction with blood. The hemolysis model is based on an Eulerian approach to consider both the shear stress and exposure time as the primary factors. These models were tested by comparing computationally predicted results with experimentally measured data. They are in excellent agreement. Our on-going activities will be including flow-induced platelet activation and deposition modeling. The advantage of CFD modeling is the ability to optimize the expended design to avoid the time-consuming and costly process of trial and error. By incorporating gas transport, blood damage, and thrombosis models, it will be a very attractive design paradigm to optimize the design of blood contacting devices.

Copyright © 2005 by the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs