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ASAIO CARDIAC ABSTRACT

ORGAN PERFUSION PUMP AS A NOVEL PULSATILE DEVICE FOR SUPPORTING THE ABDOMINAL ORGANS DURING CARDIOPUL-MONARY BYPASS

Cu, Y. J.1,2; de Kroon, T. L.2; Elstrodt, J. M.3; van Loon, J P.3; Oeveren, W. van1; Boonstra, P. W.2; Rakhorst, C.1,3

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The pulsatile perfusion flow (PPF) for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery is far from satisfactory because of the resistance of oxygenator and aortic cannula that counteract with the pulsatility. We report herein a new concept of PPF that is generated by the organ perfusion pump, a modification of the previous intra-aortic pulsatile catheter pump. Twelve pigs weighing 89 ± 4 kg were divided into a pulsatile group (n = 6) and a non-pulsatile group (n = 6). All animals had a CPB for 120 min, aorta clamped for 60 min, temperature down to 32°C, and a perfusion flow of 60 ml/kg/min. In the PPF group, the pulsatile flow was initiated from the beginning of CPB until release of the aortic clamp by a 21 Fr catheter inserted via the aortic arch to the descending aorta. This catheter was driven pneumatically by a membrane pump with an average pumping flow of 3.1 L/min on a fixed rate of 80lmin. Compared with the control group during CPB, the PPF group had a higher systolic and mean arterial pressure (p<0.01, p<0.05), higher blood flow to the gut and kidney (p<0.05, p<0.05), and similar blood flow to the hrain. Blood tests shown no difference between the two groups with regard to cell counts, freeHb, and blood lactate. However, inferior vena cava SvO2 was higher in the PPF group (p<0.05) 30 min after end of CPB. These results indicate that the organ perfusion pump is feasible for generating effective intra-aortic pulsatile flow during the ischemic phase of CPB, resulting in better perfusion to the abdominal organs.

Copyright © 2004 by the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs