Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Controlling Nutritional Status Score As a Predictive Marker for Patients With Implantable Left Ventricular Assist Device

Saito, Akihito*; Amiya, Eisuke*; Hatano, Masaru*,†; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki*; Nitta, Daisuke*; Minatsuki, Shun*; Maki, Hisataka*; Hosoya, Yumiko*; Tsuji, Masaki*; Bujo, Chie*; Nawata, Kan; Kinoshita, Osamu; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Endo, Miyoko§; Kagami, Yukie§; Nemoto, Mariko§; Ikeda, Yuichi; Morita, Hiroyuki*; Ono, Minoru; Komuro, Issei*

doi: 10.1097/MAT.0000000000000972
Original Article: PDF Only
Buy
PAP

Although a correlation between the nutritional status and the prognosis of patients with heart failure has been suggested, a correlation between the nutritional status and outcomes after the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of the Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score (range 0–12, including serum albumin, total cholesterol, and lymphocytes) as a nutritional index in speculating the prognosis of patients undergoing LVAD implantation. We examined 63 consecutive patients who underwent the continuous-flow LVAD implantation. Using the preoperative CONUT score, patients were categorized into two groups: lower CONUT score (0–4: normal to mild malnutrition) and higher CONUT score (5–12: moderate to severe malnutrition). We compared for the backgrounds and the clinical events after LVAD implantation. The higher CONUT group exhibited a significantly higher mean right atrial pressure (10.9 ± 4.7 vs. 7.3 ± 4.1 mmHg; p = 0.0019). In that group, the mortality rate was significantly higher (25% vs. 2.6%; p = 0.0059) and the Kaplan–Meier analysis showed lower survival rate. Furthermore, more bleeding events significantly occurred in the higher CONUT group. The preoperative CONUT score may reflect systemic venous congestion and offer a useful prognostic index of clinical courses after LVAD implantation.

From the *Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Department of Therapeutic Strategy for Heart Failure, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

§Department of Organ Transplantation, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Submitted for consideration September 2018; accepted for publication in revised form January 2019.

Disclosure: The authors have no conflicts of interest to report.

This work was supported by The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan through Grant-in-aid (17K09488 to Dr. Amiya).

The authors take responsibility for all aspects of the reliability and freedom from bias of the data presented and their discussed interpretation.

Correspondence: Eisuke Amiya, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8655, Japan. Email: amiyae-tky@umin.ac.jp.

Copyright © 2019 by the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs