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CHEKANOV VALERI S.; TCHEKANOV, GUENNADY V.; RIEDER, MICHELLE A.; EISENSTEIN, RUEBEN; WANKOWSKI, DAWN M.; SCHMIDT, DONALD H.; NIKOLAYCHIK, VICTOR V.; LELKES, PETER I.
ASAIO JOURNAL: September-October 1996
SLIDE FORUM #6—PROSTHETICS/BIOMATERIALS: PDF Only

The authors investigated the multi-step mechanism of healing after cardiomyoplasty, focusing on the process of angiogenesis. The authors contend that enhancement of angiogenesis and prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injuries immediately after muscle mobilization will be effective in improving cardiomyoplasty results. After cardiomyoplasty, autologous biologic glue (ABG) was administered between the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) and myocardium. By 2 months, a new pseudo interlayer was present that bridged the gap between the LDM and myocardium. Neovascularization was visible in the form of numerous small capillaries. Marked degeneration of the LDM was noted, possibly caused by muscle ischemia-reperfusion damage after mobilization.

Pockets were created of ischemic and nonischemic LDM to test for angiogenesis. One was left free of ABG (control); one received ABG only; one received ABG with aprotinin; and one received ABG with pyrrolostatin. The greatest angiogenesis was seen with ABG and pyrrolostatin. Some of the capillaries were large and had erythrocytes inside. Biopsy samples showed 9.4 ± 1.9% of the sample was occupied by blood vessels (compared with 3.6 ± 0.7% in control muscle).

These preliminary studies prove the feasibility of the authors' concept and provide evidence that angiogenesis can accelerate the healing process and provide an organic bridge between the LDM and myocardium after cardiomyoplasty.

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