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Clinical Application of a Specific Simulation Software for 3-Dimensional Orbital Volume Modeling for Orbital Wall Reconstruction

Kim, Min Ji MD*; Jeong, Woo Shik MD*; Kim, Yun Hwan BS*; Kim, Hannah MSc†‡; Cho, Hyunchul MSc; Kim, Youngjun PhD†‡; Choi, Jong-Woo MD, PhD, MMM

doi: 10.1097/SAP.0000000000001830
Head and Neck Surgery
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In this study, we developed a new 3-dimensional (3D) preoperative planning software and investigated its effectiveness by measuring orbital volume change. Fifty-six patients who underwent unilateral orbital wall reconstruction between December 2015 and February 2018 in our institute were recruited. We developed an orbit-specific automatic 3D modeling software (Osteopore CMF 3D) that can automatically detect orbital fracture site, process mirroring, measure volume, and then produce a customized orbital implant. Using preoperative and postoperative 3D computed tomography, orbital volume was measured and compared between Osteopore CMF 3D and the widely used Mimics. Intraclass correlation coefficient between Osteopore CMF 3D and Mimics showed 90.6% concordance for preoperative injured site orbital volume and 86.7% concordance for postoperative orbital volume, both being statistically significant (preoperative intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.906 [confidence interval {CI}, 0.840–0.945; P < 0.000]; postoperative intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.867 [CI, 0.773–0.922; P < 0.000]). For uninjured sites, the 2 software packages showed 76.6% preoperative concordance and 83.9% postoperative concordance, both being statistically significant (preoperative intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.766 [CI, 0.600–0.863; P < 0.000]; postoperative intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.839 [CI, 0.725–0.905; P < 0.000]). This study introduces our newly developed 3D surgical planning software specialized for orbital wall reconstruction and demonstrates its performance to be comparable with that of a widely used software.

From the *Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center;

Center for Bionics and

Division of Bio-Medical Science and Technology, KIST School, Korea University of Science and Technology; and

§Biomedical Engineering Research Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Received October 7, 2018, and accepted for publication, after revision December 16, 2018.

Conflicts of interest and sources of funding: The authors have no conflicts of interest. This study was supported by a grant (2017-724) from the Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

Ethics: The need for informed consent was waived by the institutional review board of the University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea, because of the retrospective nature of this study. This study conformed to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki.

Reprints: Jong-Woo Choi, MD, PhD, MMM, Department of Plastic Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-Ro 43-Gil, Songpa-Gu, Seoul 05505, Republic of Korea. E-mail: pschoi@amc.seoul.kr; Youngjun Kim, PhD, Principal Researcher, Center for Bionics, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 5, Hwarang-ro 14-gil, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 02792, Republic of Korea. E-mail: junekim@kist.re.kr.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.annalsplasticsurgery.com).

Online date: May 13, 2019

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