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Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

Report From 30 Years of Experience in a Single Department

Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich MD*; Henriksen, Trine Foged MD, PhD; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn MD*; Schmidt, Grethe MD*

doi: 10.1097/SAP.0b013e3182920c3d
Reconstructive Surgery
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Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications, and malignant transformation. Of 35 patients, 25 underwent surgery. Curettage was most frequently used (64%) followed by excision and tissue expansion (20%). Six percent of the patients treated with curettage, and 78% of the patients who received excision surgery required more than 1 planned procedure, and 25% versus 44% required unplanned additional surgery, respectively. Complications were noted in 25% and 67% of the patients, respectively. Cosmetic result was satisfying in 76% of patients without difference between the groups. No malignant transformation was found during a mean follow-up of 11 years. Curettage is a gentle alternative to excision with a lower complication rate and good cosmetic outcome.

From the *Department of Plastic Surgery, Breast Surgery and Burns, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, København Ø; and †Department of Plastic Surgery, Roskilde University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.

Received June 28, 2012, and accepted for publication, after revision, March 12, 2013.

Conflicts of interest and sources of funding: none declared.

Reprints: Bo Sonnich Rasmussen, MD, Department of Plastic Surgery, Breast Surgery and Burns, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København Ø, Denmark. E-mail: bosonnich@gmail.com.

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