Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Internal Jugular Vein Occlusion in Head and Neck Microsurgical Reconstruction

Kubo, Tateki MD*; Haramoto, Ushio MD*; Yano, Kenji MD*; Kakibuchi, Masao MD*; Takagi, Satoshi MD*; Nakai, Kunihiro MD*; Sakai, Yasuo MD*; Inohara, Hidenori MD; Hosokawa, Ko MD*

Original Articles
Buy

The internal jugular vein has been the preferred recipient vein in head and neck microsurgical reconstruction. However, recent reports have demonstrated internal jugular vein occlusion after functional neck dissection. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate and discuss the possibility of recipient internal jugular vein occlusion after free tissue transfer. Of 58 patients who received an end-to-side venous anastomosis with the internal jugular vein, four cases of recipient internal jugular vein occlusion were detected during the early postoperative period. Although the success rate of end-to-side anastomosis with the internal jugular vein may be high, microsurgeons should be aware of the possibility of internal jugular vein occlusion.

Four end-to-side venous anastomoses to the internal jugular vein during free-flap transfer resulted in jugular occlusion in the early postoperative period. Two flaps were lost, but one of the surviving flaps maintained retrograde venous outflow through the patent cranial extension of the jugular vein.

Departments of *Plastic Surgery, and †Otolaryngology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.

Received Feb 19, 2002, and

in revised form Mar 26, 2002.

Accepted for publication Mar 26, 2002.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr Kubo, Department of Plastic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2-C11 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

Kubo T, Haramoto U, Yano K, Kakibuchi M, Takagi S, Nakai K, Sakai Y, Inohara H, Hosokawa K. Internal jugular vein occlusion in head and neck microsurgical reconstruction.

© 2002 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.