Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

MALONE JAMES M. M.D.; BEAN, BARTON; LAGUNA, JOSE M.D.; HAMILTON, ROBERT MD.; LABADIE, ENRIQUE MD.; MOORE, WESLEY S. M.D.
Annals of Surgery: March 1980
ORIGINAL ARTICLE: PDF Only
Buy

Both Doppler supraorbital examination (OSM) and oculoplethysmography (OPG) were administered to 101 patients (202 arteries) to document the presence or absence of hemodynamically significant lesions of the internal carotid artery prior to angiography. There was no significant difference between the OSM and OPG with respect to diagnostic sensitivity or specificity, incidence of false-negative or false-positive results, and overall diagnostic accuracy. The diagnostic accuracy for the OSM and the OPG were 94.2% and 91.6%, respectively. In 171/202 (84.6%) arteries, the OSM and OPG were in diagnostic agreement, and the overall diagnostic accuracy of the combined tests was 97%. However, when the OSM and OPG did not agree (31/202 arteries, 15.4%), the diagnostic accuracy of neither the OSM nor the OPG was acceptable. Although the best diagnostic accuracy was obtained using two means of noninvasive cerebrovascular testing, in those instances where only one test may be available, the OPG would appear to be the test of choice. In those laboratories in which high diagnostic accuracy is obtained with the OSM, the addition of OPG testing will increase the overall diagnostic accuracy to a very high level. The presence of a midcervical bruit was found to have a very poor correlation with the incidence of hemodynamically significant stenoses of the internal carotid artery. Although both the OSM and OPG have minimal value in patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular disease, these tests play a very important role in screening patients for asymptomatic carotid stenosis or atypical cerebrovascular symptoms.

© Lippincott-Raven Publishers.