Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

GASPAR MAX R. M.D.; MOVIUS, HERBERT J. II M.D.; ROSENTAL, JOHN J. M.D.; ANDERSON, DANNY M.D.
Annals of Surgery: October 1976
Original Articles: PDF Only
Buy

One hundred five patients were operated upon for morbid obesity using accepted criteria for operation. Forty-five patients with the Payne operation (35 cm of jejunum anastomosed end-to-side to 10 cm of ileum) were compared with 45 patients having the Scott operation (30 cm of jejunum anastomosed end-to-end to 15 cm of ileum with the proximal cut end of ileum vented into the transverse colon). The weight loss in the first two years was similar, although the Scott procedure patients lost slightly more weight. Comparison of the two groups by a new grading system also showed little difference in the two procedures. The Scott procedure takes longer and subjects the patient to an additional anastomosis. Study of a smaller group of patients having the Scott operation with varying lengths of jejunum and ileum indicates that there should not be less than 30 cm of jejunum nor more than 15 cm of ileum left in continuity. The length of jejunum is particularly important in the production of weight loss, and accurate intraoperative measurement of intestinal length is crucial. In the postoperative period the length of functional jejunum and ileum can be determined by upper gastrointestinal barium roentgenograms.

© Lippincott-Raven Publishers.