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SIMCHEN ELISHEVA M.B.Ch.B. M.P.H.; SACKS, THEODORE M.B.Ch.B., M.MED. (PATH), F.R.C. PATH.
Annals of Surgery: December 1975
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The development of infections in 420 wounded soldiers, admitted to the Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem between October 7, 1973 and November 31, 1973, was studied. An attempt was made to relate the development of infection to the type of injury. The overall infection rate was 22%, but varied with the type of injury. Three “risk factors” were found to be associated with infection regardless of the number of injuries: 1) penetrating abdominal wounds involving the colon; 2) fractures involving the femur; 3) burns involving more than 25% of body surface. In patients with comparable injuries, the presence of infection was found to prolong the duration of hospitalization. Pseudomonas was the most common single pathogen. There were no cases of myonecrosis (gas gangrene). Of the 8 soldiers who died, 5 died with or because of infection.

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