Share this article on:

Critically Ill, Then Chronically Painful: Pain and Interference With Everyday Life

Wanderer, Jonathan P., MD, MPhil; Nathan, Naveen, MD

doi: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000003688
Infographics: Infographic

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (jon.wanderer@vanderbilt.edu)

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (n-nathan@northwestern.edu)

The Infographic is composed by Jonathan P. Wanderer, MD, MPhil, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (jon.wanderer@vanderbilt.edu), and Naveen Nathan, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (n-nathan@northwestern.edu). Illustration by Naveen Nathan, MD.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Figure

Figure

While advances in the delivery of critical care medicine have resulted in improvements in patient care and disease survival, 1 of the consequences has been the growing cohort of patients who are survivors of critical illness. The morbidity associated with survival of critical illness is incompletely understood, and methods at reducing that morbidity have not been well defined. In this infographic, we review a recent study that seeks to characterize the relationship between opioid administration during critical illness and the subsequent development of persistent pain and disability associated with persistent pain after critical illness.

ICU indicates intensive care unit.

Back to Top | Article Outline

REFERENCE

1. Hayhurst CJ, Jackson JC, Archer KR, Thompson JL, Chandrashekhar R, Hughes CG. Pain and its long-term interference of daily life after critical illness. Anesth Analg. 2018;127:690–697.
    © 2018 International Anesthesia Research Society