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Gurnaney, Harshad MBBS, MPH; Kraemer, F. Wickham MD; Ganes, Arjunan MBBS

doi: 10.1213/ANE.0b013e31823355b4
Letters to the Editor: Letters & Announcements
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Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Perelman School of Medicine Philadelphia, Pennsylvania gurnaney@email.chop.edu (Gurnaney, Kraemer, Ganes)

We applied a single drop of Dermabond to the catheter entry site, allowing it to set for a minute before any injection of local anesthetic or application of dressing.1 We then secured the catheter with a Tegaderm dressing. We do not tunnel the catheters at our institution, because using Dermabond alone without tunneling considerably decreases our accidental dislodgements (0.89%). We have had no problems to date in removing the catheters. The catheters are routinely kept in place for 2 days (range, 1–8 days).

We cannot comment on the use of soapy water, petroleum jelly, and acetone because we have not had to use these techniques to remove these catheters.2 One difference between the butyl form (Indermil) and the octyl form (Dermabond) of cyanoacrylate is that the butyl form forms a more rigid and firm bond and the octyl form forms a more flexible bond.3

Harshad Gurnaney, MBBS, MPH

F. Wickham Kraemer, MD

Arjunan Ganes, MBBS

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Perelman School of Medicine

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

gurnaney@email.chop.edu

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REFERENCES

1. Gurnaney H, Kraemer FW, Ganesh A. Dermabond decreases pericatheter local anesthetic leakage after continuous perineural infusions. Anesth Analg 2011;113:206
2. Jumani DB, Murphy P. Super glue—stuck on you. Anesth Analg 2011;113:1523–4
3. Singer AJ, Perry LC, Allen RL Jr. In vivo study of wound bursting strength and compliance of topical skin adhesives. Acad Emerg Med 2008;15:1290–4
© 2011 International Anesthesia Research Society