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Early Postoperative Subcutaneous Tissue Oxygen Predicts Surgical Site Infection

Ramarapu, Srikiran, MD

doi: 10.1213/ANE.0b013e3182161bf5
Letters to the Editor: Letters & Announcements
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Department of Anesthesiology The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Oklahoma City, Oklahoma srikiran-ramarapu@ouhsc.edu (Ramarapu)

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To the Editor

Regarding the recent study by Akca et al.,1 investigating whether early postoperative subcutaneous tissue oxygen predicts surgical site infection, the authors did not check baseline StO2 in study group patients before start of surgery to see whether there was a difference among surgical site, upper arm, and thenar eminence. Harrison et al.2 measured tissue oxygen tension at the incision site and in the arm before surgery and at 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery, and they demonstrated that preoperative StO2 was less in patients who eventually developed surgical site infection. In addition, although the study design was quite interesting, additional information of importance might have included a determination of whether the patients with surgical site infection had improvement in StO2 after treatment. Wang et al.3 measured StO2 in the lower limbs in patients with necrotizing fasciitis and demonstrated improvement in StO2 after surgical treatment.

Srikiran Ramarapu, MD

Department of Anesthesiology

The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

srikiran-ramarapu@ouhsc.edu

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REFERENCES

1. Akca O, Govinda R, Kasuya Y, Bala E, Mahboobi R, Devarajan J, Sessler DI. Early postoperative subcutaneous tissue oxygen predicts surgical site infection. Anesth Analg 2010; 111: 946–52
2. Harrison DK, Ives CL, Stansby GS. Tissue oxygen saturation, measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, and its relationship to surgical-site infections. Br J Surg 2007; 94: 87–91
3. Wang TL, Hung CR. Role of tissue oxygen saturation monitoring in diagnosing necrotizing fasciitis of the lower limbs. Ann Emerg Med 2004; 44: 222–8
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