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Molecular Properties of the "Ideal" Inhaled Anesthetic

Eger, Edmond I II, MD

Letter to the Editor: In Response
Free

Department of Anesthesia, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0464.

In Response:

I intended no dismay and ask forgiveness. The omission of my connection to Ohmeda resulted from the absence of a meaningful tie between that connection and the work in question. Ohmeda did not support the study; nor do I think they have a particular interest in the publication. Apart from the use of desflurane as a reference anesthetic in some of the studies of the additive effects of the test compounds, only the last sentence refers to desflurane and sevoflurane. (Please note that I am not a paid consultant to Abbott Laboratories.) This sentence connects these anesthetics to the molecular properties that provide optimum solubility and potency ("Consonant with these premises, the structures of two, new anesthetics, sevoflurane and desflurane, consist of three or four carbons with two or three hydrogens on no more than two carbons, and an ether linkage"). Unlike the previous article (for which Dr. Weiskopf and I were justly chided), I doubt that this sentence can be used for commercial purposes.

Edmond I Eger, II, MD

Department of Anesthesia, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0464

© 1995 International Anesthesia Research Society