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Cervical Spine Motion During Tracheal Intubation Using an Optiscope Versus the McGrath Videolaryngoscope in Patients With Simulated Cervical Immobilization: A Prospective Randomized Crossover Study

Nam, Karam MD*; Lee, Younsuk MD, PhD; Park, Hee-Pyoung MD, PhD*; Chung, Jaeyeon MD*; Yoon, Hyun-Kyu MD*; Kim, Tae Kyong MD, PhD*

doi: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000003635
Respiration and Sleep Medicine: Original Clinical Research Report
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BACKGROUND: In patients with an unstable cervical spine, maintenance of cervical immobilization during tracheal intubation is important. In McGrath videolaryngoscopic intubation, lifting of the blade to raise the epiglottis is needed to visualize the glottis, but in patients with an unstable cervical spine, this can cause cervical spine movement. By contrast, the Optiscope, a rigid video-stylet, does not require raising of the epiglottis during tracheal intubation. We therefore hypothesized that the Optiscope would produce less cervical spine movement than the McGrath videolaryngoscope during tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to compare the Optiscope with the McGrath videolaryngoscope with respect to cervical spine motion during intubation in patients with simulated cervical immobilization.

METHODS: The primary outcome of the study was the extent of cervical spine motion at the occiput–C1, C1–C2, and C2–C5 segments. In this randomized crossover study, the cervical spine angle was measured before and during tracheal intubation using either the Optiscope or the McGrath videolaryngoscope in 21 patients with simulated cervical immobilization. Cervical spine motion was defined as the change in angle at each cervical segment during tracheal intubation.

RESULTS: There was significantly less cervical spine motion at the occiput–C1 segment using the Optiscope rather than the McGrath videolaryngoscope (mean [98.33% CI]: 4.7° [2.4–7.0] vs 10.4° [8.1–12.7]; mean difference [98.33% CI]: −5.7° [−7.5 to −3.9]). There were also fewer cervical spinal motions at the C1–C2 and C2–C5 segments using the Optiscope (mean difference versus the McGrath videolaryngoscope [98.33% CI]: −2.4° [−3.7 to −1.2]) and −3.7° [−5.9 to −1.4], respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: The Optiscope produces less cervical spine motion than the McGrath videolaryngoscope during tracheal intubation of patients with simulated cervical immobilization.

From the *Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Dongguk University Medical Center Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea.

Published ahead of print 28 June 2018.

Accepted for publication May 31, 2018.

Funding: None.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Clinical trial number: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03120546).

Reprints will not be available from the authors.

Address correspondence to Tae Kyong Kim, MD, PhD, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno, Seoul 03080, Republic of Korea. Address e-mail to ktkktk@gmail.com.

Copyright © 2018 International Anesthesia Research Society
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