Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

What Does a Red Meat Allergy Have to Do With Anesthesia? Perioperative Management of Alpha-Gal Syndrome

Dunkman, W. Jonathan MD*; Rycek, Wendy PharmD; Manning, Michael W. MD, PhD*

doi: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000003460
Anesthetic Clinical Pharmacology
Buy
CME
Continuing Medical Education

Over the past decade, there has been a growing awareness of a new allergic syndrome known as alpha-gal allergy or alpha-gal syndrome, commonly recognized as a red meat allergy. We performed a review of the literature to identify articles that provide both background on this syndrome in general and any reports of reactions to medications or medical devices related to alpha-gal syndrome. Alpha-gal syndrome results from IgE to the oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose, expressed in the meat and tissues of noncatarrhine mammals. It is triggered by the bite of the lone star tick and has been implicated in immediate-onset hypersensitivity to the monoclonal antibody cetuximab and delayed-onset hypersensitivity reactions after the consumption of red meat. There is growing recognition of allergic reactions in these patients to other drugs and medical devices that contain alpha-gal. Many of these reactions result from inactive substances that are part of the manufacturing or preparation process such as gelatin or stearic acid. This allergy may be documented in a variety of ways or informally reported by the patient, requiring vigilance on the part of the anesthesiologist to detect this syndrome, given its serious implications. This allergy presents a number of unique challenges to the anesthesiologist, including proper identification of a patient with alpha-gal syndrome and selection of anesthetic and adjunctive medications that will not trigger this allergy.

From the *Division of General, Vascular and Transplant Anesthesia

Department of Pharmacy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Published ahead of print 16 April 2018.

Accepted for publication April 16, 2018.

Funding: Institutional and/or departmental.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Reprints will not be available from the authors.

Address correspondence to W. Jonathan Dunkman, MD, Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3094, Durham, NC 27710. Address e-mail to william.dunkman@duke.edu.

Copyright © 2018 International Anesthesia Research Society
You currently do not have access to this article

To access this article:

Note: If your society membership provides full-access, you may need to login on your society website