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Video Author: Ricci Vincenzo
Published on: 11.15.2021

In physiological conditions, regular gliding of the subscapularis muscle-tendon unit can be observed at the level of the coracoid/subcoracoid space. No snapping phenomena or fluid collection is visible during dynamic assessment. Note that the subscapularis muscle belly - visible at the end of external rotation - should not be misinterpreted as an anechoic pathology.

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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:08
In physiological conditions, regular gliding of the subscapularis muscle-tendon unit can be observed at the level of the coracoid/subcoracoid space. No snapping phenomena or fluid collection is visible during dynamic assessment. Note that the subscapularis muscle belly - visible at the end of external rotation - should not be misinterpreted as an anechoic pathology.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:08
Complete injury of the subscapularis muscle-tendon unit (medially retracted) is associated with an anterior translation of the humeral head. During active rotations of the glenohumeral joint, it is possible to visualize the rolling of the naked humerus just below the fibers of the deltoid muscle with a mechanical conflict in the proximity of the coracoid bone.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:16
During dynamic scanning, the synovial fluid is pushed from the glenohumeral joint to the anterior compartment of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, confirming the full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Note that the peculiar pathway of fluid is related to the dynamic pressure gradient i.e. greater inside the joint and lower in the bursal cavity.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:17
In a patient with no ultrasonographic findings of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis or rotator cuff tear, articular effusion is pushed from the glenohumeral cavity to a large superior subscapular recess during active shoulder external rotation. This phenomenon is related to the presence of Weitbrecht foramina at the level of the anterior glenohumeral capsule.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:27
The dynamic evaluation clearly shows friction between the (enlarged) proximal segment of the LHBT and the anterior deltoid muscle fibers. Herein, the - highly innervated - subdeltoid fascia should also be considered among the potential pain generators.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:29
The shape of the bicipital groove and the surrounding stabilizing structures (soft tissues) ensure a correct function of the LHBT during active shoulder movements. Note the anatomical continuity of the transverse humeral ligament with the subscapularis tendon fibers.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:22
The LHBT floats inside the effusion of the synovial sheath but does not shift out of the bicipital groove during dynamic scanning, confirming its mechanical stability.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:15
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:17
Regular gliding of the rotator cuff and synovial bursa (under the coracoacromial arch) during dynamic assessment. No snapping phenomena or fluid collection is visible.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:08
During dynamic assessment, transient snapping of the bursal nodule is clearly visualized under the coracoacromial ligament. Note that the mechanical conflict between the soft tissues can be painful and related to a feeling of click complained by the patient.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:21
A partially fragmented calcific deposition (located inside the rotator cuff tendons) impinges with the coracoacromial ligament during the dynamic evaluation - also reproducing the patient’s complaint.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:15
In a patient with massive full-thickness tear of the superior portion of the rotator cuff, the thickened proximal segment of the LHBT, snapping under the coracoacromial ligament is clearly visible during the dynamic assessment.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:26
Regular gliding of the superior portion of the rotator cuff and subacromial/subdeltoid bursa (under the acromion) during active shoulder abduction. No mechanical impingement or fluid displacement is visible.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:10
Dynamic US imaging of the acromiohumeral space during abduction and adduction shows snapping of a bursal nodule under the inferior edge of the acromion.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:10
Dynamic assessment of the acromioclavicular joint (during horizontal adduction) shows misalignment of the articular surfaces with capsular bulging, confirming the posttraumatic joint instability.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:16
Dynamic assessment of the rotator interval (using the simplified Crass maneuver) shows the normal stabilization of the intraarticular portion of the LHBT by the soft tissues (the pulley). However, small amount of effusion is pushed from the glenohumeral joint into a delaminated rotator cuff tear, passing through a focal defect of the anterolateral capsule.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:29
During dynamic assessment, physiological rolling of the humeral head inside the glenoid is visualized. There is no synovial fluid or gas microbubbles slipping between the glenoid and the biceps-labral complex, confirming the anatomical integrity. The acoustic shadow on the left side of the screen is related to the acromion.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:05
Regular gliding of the posterior rotator cuff and the glenohumeral capsule - at the level of the posterior retroacromial space - during active shoulder internal rotation.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:27
Intraarticular effusion can be squeezed from the anterior to the posterior compartment of the glenohumeral capsule using active shoulder rotations. External rotation of the shoulder puts tension on the anterior capsule, pushing the fluid in the posterior capsule-synovial compartment i.e. between the infraspinatus muscle-tendon unit and the posterior labrum.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:10
Dynamic assessment clearly shows an advanced/degenerative deformity of the humeral head (associated with complete injury of the posterior rotator cuff and/or joint capsule) and severe subdeltoid effusion, impinging posteriorly with the glenoid bone. During active shoulder rotations, the fluid is pushed from the glenohumeral cavity to the subdeltoid collection, increasing the local pressure and exacerbating the pain.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:08
In physiological conditions, regular gliding of the subscapularis muscle-tendon unit can be observed at the level of the coracoid/subcoracoid space. No snapping phenomena or fluid collection is visible during dynamic assessment. Note that the subscapularis muscle belly - visible at the end of external rotation - should not be misinterpreted as an anechoic pathology.
Play Video |
Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:08
Complete injury of the subscapularis muscle-tendon unit (medially retracted) is associated with an anterior translation of the humeral head. During active rotations of the glenohumeral joint, it is possible to visualize the rolling of the naked humerus just below the fibers of the deltoid muscle with a mechanical conflict in the proximity of the coracoid bone.
Play Video |
Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:27
The dynamic evaluation clearly shows friction between the (enlarged) proximal segment of the LHBT and the anterior deltoid muscle fibers. Herein, the - highly innervated - subdeltoid fascia should also be considered among the potential pain generators.
Play Video |
Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:17
Regular gliding of the rotator cuff and synovial bursa (under the coracoacromial arch) during dynamic assessment. No snapping phenomena or fluid collection is visible.
Play Video |
Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:15
Minor movements of the shoulder - coupled with gentle sono-palpation - are necessary to visualize dynamic floating of the hypertrophic villi inside the bursal effusion. Note its connection with the bursal wall i.e. the stabilizing peduncle.
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Creator: Ricci Vincenzo
Duration: 0:29
Combining sono-palpation and small movements of the shoulder; the “complex pattern” of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa with several gas microbubbles moving inside the effusion, synovial fringes and thickened fibrotic septum partially compartmentalizing the bursal cavity are clearly visible. Note that the small gas bubbles might often be related to the presence of microcracks from the post-operative tendon, generating persistent flowing of the synovial fluid between the bursal cavity and the glenohumeral joint. Needless to say, such bubbles can otherwise/possibly represent infection with anaerobic bacteria as well.
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Creator: Paul Winston
Duration: 4:09
Diagnostic nerve blocks have been used for decades in spasticity. They allow for the direct assessment of the contribution of individual muscles to spasticity and the differentiation between a true musculotendinous contracture versus a reversible spastic deformity due to spastic muscle overactivity. There is a paucity of studies that show the use of ultrasound with e-stimulation to improve accuracy and the speed of localization of nerves. Ultrasound allows for the easy localization of the blood vessels around which nerve and their fascicles course and allows for direct localization of the nerve and visualizes targeted muscle stimulation.
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Creator: Paul Winston
Duration: 10:17
Cryoneurotomy is a novel percutaneous treatment of spasticity. A retrospective chart review identified 11 patients with chronic flexed-elbow spasticity, who received a diagnostic nerve block (DNB) and demonstrated increased range of motion and/or reduced spasticity. All patients subsequently received cryoneurotomy of the musculocutaneous nerve branch to the brachialis muscle and 3 patients had an additional radial nerve cryoneurotomy to the brachioradialis muscle. Manual and video evaluations took place before and after DNB, and at least 5 months post-cryoneurotomy (mean 12.5 months). This video vignette demonstrates the reproduction of the DNB effects and changes to spasticity and range of motion.
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Creator: Michael Wainberg
Duration: 4:22
This patient education video prepares the patient for their telemedicine Hand Clinic evaluation. Elements include localization of the patient’s chief complaint and simultaneous inspection and self-palpation of the elbow, forearm, wrist and hands.The video depicts the components of the virtual physical exam: Range of motion, sensation, strength testing, functional testing, and special tests/provocative maneuvers.
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Creator: Ke-Vin Chang
Duration: 00:57
US imaging revealed partial detachment of the medial gastrocnemius muscle fibers from the deep aponeurosis. A fusiform and anechoic compartment was seen separating the medial gastrocnemius and underlying soleus muscles. Strain US elastography was applied. During rhythmic compressions, the color of the lesion (mostly being red) was significantly different from that of the surrounding area (being either blue or green). As the target had much more elasticity than the adjacent muscles, we speculated that its main component was fluid. US guided aspiration was performed.
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Creator: Byung Joo Lee & Donghwi Park
Duration: 0:44
Video 1: This video shows dynamic ultrasound of a 60-year-old man with posterosuperior labral tear. Although there is not definite a posterosuperior labral tear in neutral posture, a detachment of posterosuperior labral tear were seen in dynamic ultrasound during abduction and external rotation posture. The abduction and external rotation motion of the glenohumeral joint usually induces the humeral head to rotate externally, which gives stress to the posterosuperior labrum. In a normal posterosuperior labrum, only a slightly blunted posterosuperior labrum without any detachment is detected during abduction and external rotation motion. However, this motion can induce posterior and medial detachment of the labrum in patients with damaged PS labrum.
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Creator: TUGCE OZEKLI MISIRLIOGLU
Duration: 1:04
With this video, we want to draw attention to a very rare cause of meralgia paresthetica; inguinal lymph node enlargement. We also want to emphasize the superiority of ultrasound of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve before the injection in treatment of meralgia paresthetica.
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Creator: Chueh-Hung Wu
Mathieu Boudier-Revéret
Duration: 2:27
Two cases referred as “piriformis syndrome” which received needling of gluteus maximus and piriformis, showing prominent twitch responses in GMax only.
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Creator: Byung Joo Lee & Donghwi Park
Duration: 0:35
Video 2: This is a dynamic ultrasonography of a 36-year-old man with posterosuperior labral tear. Although the PS labrum appears as a fibrillary hyperechoic triangle in neutral position, hypoechoic lesion is distinct in PS labrum. During the ABER maneuver, leakage of the joint fluid through torn PS labrum can be seen. In this case the fluid flow through the tear is admittedly a subtle finding and the presence of a GHJ effusion (not seen in this case) may make this examination more difficult.
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Creator: Chueh-Hung Wu, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret
Duration: 2:28
The case of a 26-year-old man with lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve entrapment within a post-surgical scar at the forearm is presented with both diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound images.
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Creator: Wei-Ting Wu
Duration: 00:35
Using a curvilinear transducer in the oblique coronal plane, and the probe is placed between the coracoid process and acromioclavicular joint. A hypoechoic slip inside the hyperechoic triangular labrum is identified. Proximal portion of the biceps tendon (long head) appeared intact. With forcefully pulling the arm downward, the slip was enlarged with fluid filling the gap.
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Creator: James Hallinan, Edward Smitaman and Brady Huang
Duration: 1:53
This video shows dynamic ultrasound images with real-time ankle movements. Dynamic scanning in the transverse view showed peroneus longus muscle herniation at the lateral leg during ankle dorsiflexion and eversion. A corresponding MRI also shows the muscle herniation.
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Creator: Tsung-Yung Tang; Shau-Gang Shyu; Chueh-Hung Wu
Duration: 2:19
This video demonstrates an ultrasound-guided 5-in-1 injection for trigger point injection in the trapezius, levator scapulae and rhomboid muscles, and nerve hydrodissection of the spinal accessory nerve and dorsal scapular nerve for a patient with upper back pain with neuropathic characteristics.
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Creator: Daniel M Cushman, MD
Duration: 0:16
This video demonstrates needle electromyography on a patient with respiratory synkinesis, with a needle in the right biceps brachii muscle. The first section of the video shows a relaxed patient, with the appearance of motor units associated with the inhalation phase of breathing. Next, the electromyographer asks her to take a deep breath with subsequent activation of numerous atypical motor units, which is done three times. For the last section, the patient holds her breath, and the motor unit stops firing.
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Creator: Yi-Chian Wang, Shaw-Gang Shyu, Chueh-Hung Wu, Tyng-Guey Wang
Duration: 1:52
This video showed the axial and sagittal ultrasound-guided injection to the cricopharyngeal muscle, and showed the videofluoroscopic swallowing study results before and after the injection.
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Creator: Ke-Vin Chang
Duration: 1:00
The video demonstrated tracking a swollen extensor carpi ulnaris tendon with a thickened retinaculum. An enlarged nerve segment with loss of fascicular echotexture was observed, and was impinged by the thickened retinaculum.
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Creator: The video demonstrated tracking the brachial plexus from the supraclavicular to root level and ultrasound guided injection to the cervical roots of C5 and C6.
Duration: 2:39
The video demonstrated tracking the brachial plexus from the supraclavicular to root level and ultrasound guided injection to the cervical roots of C5 and C6.
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Creator: Ke-Vin Chang
Duration: 3:07
The video demonstrates the anatomy of the superior cluneal nerve and the ultrasonographic technique for imaging and injecting the superior cluneal nerve.
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Creator: Yi-Chian Wang, Rachel J. Lew, Chia-Wei Lee, Yi-Pin Chiang
Duration: 3:37
Extensor Tendinopathy (Tennis Elbow) is a common term used to describe pathology of the forearm extensor tendons that converge to anchor the muscles to the lateral elbow. During traditional ultrasonography using the longitudinal scanning method, it is difficult to determine which component of the common extensor tendon (CET) is affected. This video presents the addition of a transverse scan to better visualize the tendons that join and form the CET. Two cases seen in our ultrasound clinic were demonstrated. The findings from the transverse scan helped to provide modifications of specific wrist and hand activities to facilitate recovery.
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Creator: Murat Karkucak
Duration: 1:51
AN ULTRASOUND VIDEO DEMONSTRATION FOR LUMBAR FACET JOINT INJECTION
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Creator: Ming-Yen Hsiao, Chen-Yu Hung, Ke-Vin Chang, Levent Özçakar
Duration: 0:29
Tracking of the the long head of the biceps tendon from the bicipital groove to the proximal insertion of the superior labrum.
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Creator: Ming-Yen Hsiao, Chen-Yu Hung, Ke-Vin Chang, Levent Özçakar
Duration: 0:12
Dynamic examination of the the long head of the biceps tendon at the proximal insertion is performed by supinating and pronating the forearm while keeping the upper arm fixed.
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Creator: Ming-Yen Hsiao, Chen-Yu Hung, Ke-Vin Chang, Levent Özçakar
Duration: 0:11
Dynamic stress test of the the long head of the biceps tendon by applying an inferior distraction force to the humerus.
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Creator: Ming-Yen Hsiao, Ke-Vin Chang , Levent Özçakar
Duration: 1:01
Dynamic ultrasonography of anterior cruciate ligament from knee flexion to extension and extension to flexion.
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Creator: Ming-Yen Hsiao, Ke-Vin Chang , Levent Özçakar
Duration: 0:15
Dynamic ultrasonography of anteromedial bundle of anterior cruciate ligament with a simultaneous anterior drawer test
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Creator: Ming-Yen Hsiao, Ke-Vin Chang , Levent Özçakar
Duration: 0:15
Dynamic ultrasonography of posterolateral bundle of anterior cruciate ligament with a simultaneous anterior drawer test
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Creator: Thiru M. Annaswamy, Kimberly Davis, Corey Armstead
Duration: 0:06
Needle electromyography in low cervical paraspinal muscles of a patient with EMG disease demonstrate increased insertional activity and myotonic discharges at 2 different sweep speeds; 20ms (video 1) and 500ms (video 2). Video 1: 20ms sweep displays a myotonic discharge that can appear as fibrillations and positive sharp waves or complex repetitive discharges. Video 2: 500ms sweep reveals the “wax and wane” characteristic specific to myotonic discharges. Myotonic discharges can have variable appearance and sound depending on sweep speed. By definition discharges need to last over 500ms and in 3 or more areas outside of an endplate.
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Creator: Thiru M. Annaswamy, Kimberly Davis, Corey Armstead
Duration: 0:29
Needle electromyography in low cervical paraspinal muscles of a patient with EMG disease demonstrate increased insertional activity and myotonic discharges at 2 different sweep speeds; 20ms (video 1) and 500ms (video 2). Video 1: 20ms sweep displays a myotonic discharge that can appear as fibrillations and positive sharp waves or complex repetitive discharges. Video 2: 500ms sweep reveals the “wax and wane” characteristic specific to myotonic discharges. Myotonic discharges can have variable appearance and sound depending on sweep speed. By definition discharges need to last over 500ms and in 3 or more areas outside of an endplate.
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Creator: Hung-Jui Chuang, Ming-Yen Hsiao, Chueh-Hung Wu, Levent Özçakar
Duration: 1:29
Ulnar nerve subluxation or snapping triceps syndrome is the condition of anterior sliding of the ulnar nerve or part of the triceps muscle over the medial epicondyle during elbow flexion. This video presents the real-time dynamic visualization of the entire process of ulnar nerve subluxation and snapping triceps during joint movement of the elbow using ultrasonography.
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Creator: Chen-Yu Hung
Duration: 0:41
Demonstration of the dynamic stress test of both the normal and injured wrists as well as the Doppler ultrasound imaging of the injured TFCC.
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Creator: Jia-Pei, Hong, MD, Henry L. Lew, MD, PhD, Chih-Hong, Lee, MD, Simon F.T. Tang, MD,
Duration: 2:06
The authors demonstrated ultrasound-guided technique in treating carpal tunnel syndrome to avoid damaging the median nerve and adjacent soft tissue. Since the median nerve goes deeper at distal hamate level, distal approach may provide larger space for initial needle insertion. Under long-axial view, the whole stretch of median nerve could be visualized when the needle progressed proximally in the access of in-plane.
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Creator: Carl PC CHEN
Duration: 2:14
Injection treatment to the glenohumeral joint is often needed to treat shoulder problems such as adhesive capsulitis. This can be done through blind palpation technique, fluoroscopic or musculoskeletal ultrasound guidance. In recent years, ultrasound has been proven to increase the accuracy of needle placement into the glenohumeral joint.
Glenohumeral joint injection can be done through the anterior rotator interval approach or the posterior approach techniques. The posterior injection technique offers an easier and a more effective approach to the glenohumeral joint with less extravasation rate as compared with the anterior approach. The video demonstrates how the posterior injection approach is done through ultrasound guidance.
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Creator: Ming-Yen Hsiao, Shaw-Gang Shyu, Chueh-Hung Wu, Levent Özçakar
Duration: 1:15
The video shows dynamic ultrasound imaging for type A intrasheath subluxation of the peroneal tendons. Transposition of the peroneal longus and brevis tendons during ankle dorsiflexion and evertion is demonstrated.
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Creator: Kai-Shiang Chang, Yu-Hsuan Cheng, Chueh-Hung Wu, Levent Özçakar
Duration: 4:10
This video shows the dynamic images for the iliotibial band snapping hip syndrome, which could not be detected by the MRI exam. If an individual has lateral hip pain and correlated history, dynamic ultrasound imaging is the best modality to diagnose iliotibial band snapping hip syndrome.
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Creator: Chueh-Hung Wu
Shaw-Gang Shyu
Levent Özçakar
Tyng-Guey Wang
Duration: 0:56
This video showed the real-time ankle movements and the ultrasound images. Dynamic scanning (transverse view) at the level of the lateral malleolus showed anterior subluxation of the peroneal longus tendon over the malleolus during dorsiflexion and eversion. The peroneus longus tendon returned to the normal anatomic position at rest.
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Creator: Carl PC Chen, MD, PhD, Henry L Lew, MD, PhD, Simon FT Tang, MD
Duration: 5:07
Ultrasound Guided Caudal Epidural Injection Technique
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Creator: Tomokazu Takakura
Duration: 0:08
Video demonstrates popping-up performed by an experienced surfer.
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Creator: Chih-Kuang Chen, MD, Henry L. Lew, MD, PhD.
Duration: 4:09
From an upcoming issue of the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
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Creator: Ke-Vin Chang
Duration: 3:07
The video demonstrates the anatomy of the superior cluneal nerve and the ultrasonographic technique for imaging and injecting the superior cluneal nerve.
Play Video |