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Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation for Tendon-Bone Healing: A Dose-dependent Study

Lu, Hongbin MD1; Liu, Fei MD1; Chen, Can MD1; Wang, Zhanwen MD1; Chen, Huabin MD1; Qu, Jin MD1; Zhang, Tao MD1; Xu, Daqi MD1; Hu, Jianzhong MD2

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: October 7, 2017 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000844
Research Article: PDF Only

Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the dosage effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS) on tendon-bone (T-B) healing.

Design Standard partial patellectomies were performed on 120 mature New Zealand rabbits randomly assigned into three groups: a control group (daily mock sonication, 20 min), a qd group (daily ultra-sonication, 20 min), and a bid group (ultra-sonication twice a day, 20 min each time). The rabbits were sacrificed 8 or 16 weeks postoperatively, and the microarchitectural, histological, and mechanical properties of the patella-patellar tendon (PPT) interface were evaluated.

Results Micro-computed tomography analysis showed that the bid group exhibited more new bone formation and mineralization than the other groups in the T-B healing position at both 8 and 16 weeks postoperatively. Histological assessments confirmed the bid group exhibited a significantly better PPT interface than the other groups, as shown by the increased formation and remodeling of newly formed bone and a fibrocartilage layer. The biomechanical properties of the regenerated PPT interface significantly improved in the bid group.

Conclusions LIPUS treatment twice a day was more effective than the once-a-day treatment on tendon-bone healing.

1Department of Sports Medicine, Key Laboratory of Organ Injury, Aging and Regenerative Medicine of Hunan Province, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University. 2Department of Spine Surgery, Key Laboratory of Organ Injury, Aging and Regenerative Medicine of Hunan Province, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University.

Corresponding Author: Jianzhong Hu, MD, Department of Spine Surgery, Key Laboratory of Organ Injury, Aging and Regenerative Medicine of Hunan Province, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University.Phone:+86-13875855748; fax number:þ86-731-84327332; E-mail: jianzhonghu@hotmail.com

Funding:National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.81171699, 81472072); Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China(Grant No. 20110162110068). We have no financial affiliation (including research funding) or involvement with any commercial organization that has a direct financial interest in any matter included in this manuscript. All authors do not have any possible conflicts of interest.This manuscript is original that has not been previously published in part or whole.

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