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Exercise training guidelines for multiple sclerosis, stroke, and Parkinson’s disease

Rapid review and synthesis

Kim, Yumi, MS1,5; Lai, Byron, PhD2,5; Mehta, Tapan, PhD3,5; Thirumalai, Mohanraj, PhD3,5; Padalabalanarayanan, Sangeetha, MS5; Rimmer, James H., PhD3,5; Motl, Robert W., PhD2,5

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: March 6, 2019 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000001174
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ABSTRACT The translation of knowledge from exercise training research into the clinical management of multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, and Parkinson’s disease (PD) requires evidence-based guidelines that are uniformly recognizable by healthcare practitioners and patients/clients with these diseases. This paper synthesized resources that reported aerobic and resistance training guidelines for people with MS, stroke, and PD. Systematic searches yielded 25 eligible resources from electronic databases and websites or textbooks of major organizations. Data were extracted (exercise frequency, intensity, time, and type) and synthesized into recommendations per disease. Exercise guidelines for MS consistently recommended 2-3 days/week of aerobic training (10-30 minutes at moderate-intensity) and 2-3 days/week of resistance training (1-3 sets between 8-15 repetition maximum (RM)). Exercise guidelines for stroke recommended 3-5 days/week of aerobic training (20-40 minutes at moderate-intensity) and 2-3 days/week of resistance training (1-3 sets between 8-15 repetitions between 30-50% 1-RM). Exercise guidelines for PD recommended 3-5 days/week of aerobic training (20-60 minutes at moderate-intensity), and 2-3 days/week of resistance training (1-3 sets of 8-12 repetitions between 40-50% of 1-RM). This harmonization of exercise guidelines provides a prescriptive basis for healthcare providers, exercise professionals, and people with these diseases regarding disease-specific exercise programming.

1 Ph.D. Program in Rehabilitation Science, Department of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

2 Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

3 Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

4 Department of Health Services Administration, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

5 University of Alabama at Birmingham/Lakeshore Foundation Research Collaborative, Birmingham, AL, USA

Correspondence to: Yumi Kim, MS, University of Alabama at Birmingham/Lakeshore Foundation Research Collaborative, 4000 Ridgeway Drive, Birmingham, AL 35209, USA; email: yumikim@uab.edu

Authorship: YK: Article selection/screening, data extraction/synthesis, writing, editing, BL: Data cross-check, exercise guideline summary, writing, editing, TM: Reviewing, editing, MT: Reviewing, editing, SP: Reviewing, editing, JH: Exercise guideline summary, reviewing, writing, editing, RM: Exercise guideline summary, reviewing, writing, editing

All the authors approved and critically revised the manuscript.

FUNDING: This work was supported by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (grant number 90REGE0002-01-00). The National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research is a Centre within the Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services. The contents of this manuscript do not necessarily represent the policy of these groups and you should not assume endorsement by the US Federal Government.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship and/or publication of this article.

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