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Exercise Training Guidelines for Multiple Sclerosis, Stroke, and Parkinson Disease

Rapid Review and Synthesis

Kim, Yumi MS; Lai, Byron PhD; Mehta, Tapan PhD; Thirumalai, Mohanraj PhD; Padalabalanarayanan, Sangeetha MS; Rimmer, James H. PhD; Motl, Robert W. PhD

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: July 2019 - Volume 98 - Issue 7 - p 613–621
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000001174
Literature Review
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The translation of knowledge from exercise training research into the clinical management of multiple sclerosis, stroke, and Parkinson disease requires evidence-based guidelines that are uniformly recognizable by healthcare practitioners and patients/clients. This article synthesized resources that reported aerobic and resistance training guidelines for people with multiple sclerosis, stroke, and Parkinson disease. Systematic searches yielded 25 eligible resources from electronic databases and Web sites or textbooks of major organizations. Data were extracted (exercise frequency, intensity, time, and type) and synthesized into three sets of recommendations. Exercise guidelines for multiple sclerosis consistently recommended 2–3 d/wk of aerobic training (10–30 mins at moderate intensity) and 2–3 d/wk of resistance training (1–3 sets between 8 and 15 repetition maximum). Exercise guidelines for stroke recommended 3–5 d/wk of aerobic training (20–40 mins at moderate intensity) and 2–3 d/wk of resistance training (1–3 sets of 8–15 repetitions between 30% and 50% 1 repetition maximum). Exercise guidelines for Parkinson disease recommended 3–5 d/wk of aerobic training (20–60 mins at moderate intensity) and 2–3 d/wk of resistance training (1–3 sets of 8–12 repetitions between 40% and 50% of 1 repetition maximum). This harmonization of exercise guidelines provides a prescriptive basis for healthcare providers, exercise professionals, and people with multiple sclerosis, stroke, and Parkinson disease regarding exercise programming.

From the Rehabilitation Science, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (YK); University of Alabama at Birmingham/Lakeshore Foundation Research Collaborative, Birmingham, Alabama (YK, BL, TM, MT, SP, JHR, RWM); Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (BL, RWM); and Department of Health Services Administration, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (TM, MT).

All correspondence should be addressed to: Yumi Kim, MS, University of Alabama at Birmingham/Lakeshore Foundation Research Collaborative, 4000 Ridgeway Dr, Birmingham, AL 35209.

YK did the article selection/screening, data extraction/synthesis, writing, and editing. BL did the data cross-check, exercise guideline summary, writing, and editing. TM, MT, and SP did the reviewing and editing. JHR did the exercise guideline summary, reviewing, writing, and editing. RWM did the exercise guideline summary, reviewing, writing, and editing.

All the authors approved and critically revised the article.

This study was supported by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (Grant Number 90REGE0002). The National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research is a center within the Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services. The contents of this article do not necessarily represent the policy of these groups and you should not assume endorsement by the US Federal Government.

Yumi Kim is in training.

Financial disclosure statements have been obtained, and no conflicts of interest have been reported by the authors or by any individuals in control of the content of this article.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.ajpmr.com).

Online date: March 8, 2019

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