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Walking Speed Is Correlated With the Isokinetic Muscular Strength of the Knee in Patients With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A

Reynaud, Vivien, MD; Morel, Claire, MD; Givron, Pascal, MD; Clavelou, Pierre, MD, PhD; Cornut-Chauvinc, Catherine, MD; Pereira, Bruno, PhD; Taithe, Frederic, MD; Coudeyre, Emmanuel, MD, PhD

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: May 2019 - Volume 98 - Issue 5 - p 422–425
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000001084
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Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most common hereditary neuropathy. Affected individuals have a distal motor deficit, initially affecting the lower limbs and impairing walking performance. Isokinetic dynamometry can be used to objectively assess muscle strength of patients with neuromuscular disorders. No studies have evaluated the effect of muscle strength deficits of knee extensors and flexors on walking parameters for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. The purpose of this study was to determine correlations between the isokinetic muscular strength of knee flexors and knee extensors and walk parameters for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. isokinetic muscular strength of the knee was assessed on an isokinetic dynamometer (Cybex) and walking by instrumented walkway analysis (GaitRite). We included 33 patients (23 females, mean ± SD age 46.7 ± 13.3 yrs, mean ± SD body mass index 25.7 ± 4.6 kg/m2). We found a correlation between walking speed and isokinetic muscular strength of knee extensors for the entire population and between walking speed and isokinetic muscular strength of knee extensors and knee flexors for patients younger than 50 yrs. Isokinetic dynamometry can provide objective measures of knee muscle strength, which is correlated with walking speed but not cadence or step/stride length of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

From the Service de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, INRA, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France (VR, CM, PG, EC); Service de neurologie, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, INSERM Clermont Auvergne Université, Clermont-Ferrand, France (PC, FT); Clinique Charcot, Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France (CC-C); and Direction recherche clinique et Innovation, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, France (BP).

All correspondence should be addressed to: Emmanuel Coudeyre, MD, PhD, Service de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Hôpital Nord, 61 Rue de Chateaugay, BP 30056, 63118 Cébazat, France.

Supported by Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital for funding (2012).

Each individual named as an author meets the uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals criteria for authorship.

Vivien Reynaud is in training.

Financial disclosure statements have been obtained, and no conflicts of interest have been reported by the authors or by any individuals in control of the content of this article.

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