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Short-Term Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Combined with Task-Related Training on Upper Extremity Function, Spasticity, and Grip Strength in Subjects with Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

Lee, Jung-Sun OT, BSc; Kim, Chang-Yong PT, PhD; Kim, Hyeong-Dong RPT, PhD

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: August 2016 - Volume 95 - Issue 8 - p 608–617
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000454
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Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration training combined with task-related training on arm function, spasticity, and grip strength in subjects with poststroke hemiplegia.

Design Forty-five subjects with poststroke were randomly allocated to 3 groups, each with 15 subjects as follows: control group, whole-body vibration group, and whole-body vibration plus task-related training group. Outcome was evaluated by clinical evaluation and measurements of the grip strength before and 4 weeks after intervention.

Results Our results show that there was a significantly greater increase in the Fugl-Meyer scale, maximal grip strength of the affected hand, and grip strength normalized to the less affected hand in subjects undergoing the whole-body vibration training compared with the control group after the test. Furthermore, there was a significantly greater increase in the Wolf motor function test and a decrease in the modified Ashworth spasticity total scores in subjects who underwent whole-body vibration plus task-related training compared with those in the other 2 groups after the test.

Conclusions The findings indicate that the use of whole-body vibration training combined with task-related training has more benefits on the improvement of arm function, spasticity, and maximal grip strength than conventional upper limb training alone or with whole-body vibration in people with poststroke hemiplegia.

Supplemental digital content is available in the text.

From the Department of Epidemiology and Health Informatics, The Graduate School of Public Health, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (J-SL); Department of Health Science, The Graduate School, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (C-YK); and Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea (H-DK).

All correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to: Chang-Yong Kim, PT, PhD, Department of Health Science, The Graduate School, Korea University, Hana Science Building B, Anam-ro, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-701, Republic of Korea.

IRB or Ethics Committee registration: The study was approved by the Human Research Sciences of local ethics committee and registered with University Clinical Trials Registry.

All authors were fully committed to absolute integrity and remained unbiased throughout the study. None of the authors had any conflicts of interest or carried any commitments that would influence their duties. The roles of the authors in this study are as follows: Jung-Sun Lee: primary author, manuscript writing, experimental procedures, interpretation of the results, and management of the study; Chang Yong Kim: manuscript writing, management of the study, critical discussion, and corresponding author; Hyeong-Dong Kim: experimental procedures and critical discussion.

Financial disclosure statements have been obtained, and no conflicts of interest have been reported by the authors or by any individuals in control of the content of this article.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.ajpmr.com).

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