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Describing Functioning, Disability, and Health with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health Brief Core Set for Stroke

Quintas, Rui, MSc; Cerniauskaite, Milda, MSc; Ajovalasit, Daniela, MSc; Sattin, Davide, PsyD; Boncoraglio, Giorgio, MD; Parati, Eugenio Agostino, MD; Leonardi, Matilde, MD

American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: February 2012 - Volume 91 - Issue 13 - p S14–S21
doi: 10.1097/PHM.0b013e31823d4ba9
Original Research Articles
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Objective The aim of this article was to demonstrate that stroke diagnosis alone does not explain differences and variety in the functioning and disability of patients. We suggest that the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health Brief Core Set for Stroke is a useful, brief, and functional instrument to produce a functioning profile for stroke patients.

Design This article reports the baseline results of a longitudinal study with 111 patients with stroke and their functioning profiles obtained with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health Brief Core Set for Stroke.

Results Most frequently reported problems in body functions were memory, muscle power functions, and attention functions. Walking activities, speaking, and understanding spoken messages are the main restricted and limited activities. Principal differences between capacity and performance (i.e., the impact of environment in performing the activities) were found in activities of self-care, such as washing oneself or dressing. Immediate family and health professionals are the main facilitators reported by patients.

Conclusions The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health Brief Core Set for Stroke reports accurately on the main problematic areas of functioning and activities of daily living of people after stroke. It is a brief and useful instrument to use in clinical practice and it can be proposed as a “starting point” to plan interventions and organize services for patients after stroke.

From the Neurological Institute Carlo Besta, Milan, Italy.

All correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to: Rui Quintas, MSc, Scientific Directorate, Neurological Institute Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133, Milan, Italy.

Financial disclosure statements have been obtained, and no conflicts of interest have been reported by the authors or by any individuals in control of the content of this article.

Funded by the European Commission, Sixth Framework Programme (Multidisciplinary Research Network on Health and Disability in Europe project). Contract number: MRTN-CT-2006-035794.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.